Senators push for quicker generic drug access

July 23, 2013 by Henry C. Jackson

(AP)—Two senators want to do away with the agreements that pharmaceutical companies make with one another to keep lower-priced generic copies of brand-name drugs off the market.

Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Republican Charles Grassley of Iowa say such "pay-for-delay" deals force consumers to pay higher prices for critical drugs. Their bill would make such agreements illegal unless the companies can prove in court that they aren't anti-competitive.

Grassley says Congress, in his words, "should be doing all we can to see that the American consumer has access to lower-priced drugs as soon as possible."

Representatives of the tell a Senate antitrust subcommittee chaired by Klobuchar that the agreements sometimes shorten the time for to reach the market, particularly in patent disputes.

Explore further: US: 'Pay to delay' generic drugs can be illegal (Update)

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VOR
not rated yet Jul 24, 2013
We dont just need socialized healthcare. We need socialized drug development. It wouldn't be such a big leap, a waste, or a killer of innovation. The 'bottom line' inescapable, irrefutable truth is that drugs-for-profit will never have the patients' health as the only priority, and sometimes not even the priority. This is reflected over and over again in many ways including biased trials/conflicts of interest, the hiding/downplaying of dangerous results to continue to market, and advertising-derived (excess) demand. Money should NOT be at stake when our health is. The amount of R&D $ put into a drug should have no influence on it's acceptance. And money should be allocated to test/discover what are likely many untapped (because they can't be patented, or are simpler or legacy drugs that were never tested for alternate indictation etc) effective treatments.

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