Sucralose affects response to oral glucose load in obese

July 2, 2013
Sucralose affects response to oral glucose load in obese
For obese adults who do not use non-nutritive sweetener, sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load, according to a study published online April 30 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—For obese adults who do not use non-nutritive sweetener (NNS), sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load, according to a study published online April 30 in Diabetes Care.

M. Yanina Pepino, Ph.D., from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and colleagues examined the acute effects of sucralose ingestion on the metabolic response to an oral glucose load in 17 obese individuals who did not use NNS and were insulin sensitive. In a randomized crossover design study, participants underwent a five-hour modified on two occasions 10 minutes after consuming sucralose or water.

The researchers found that sucralose ingestion caused significantly greater incremental increases in peak concentrations and insulin area under the curve, as well as a greater peak rate, and caused significant decreases in insulin clearance and insulin sensitivity, compared with the control condition. For active glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon incremental area under the curve, or indices of sensitivity to the ?-cell response to glucose, there were no significant differences between the conditions.

"In conclusion, the results from our study demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and hormonal responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume NNS," the authors write. "These findings support the notion that sucralose is not metabolically inert but has physiologic effects."

Tate & Lyle provided sucralose for the study.

Explore further: Artificial sweeteners may do more than sweeten

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Artificial sweeteners may do more than sweeten

May 29, 2013
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a popular artificial sweetener can modify how the body handles sugar.

High sugar intake linked to low dopamine release in insulin-resistant patients

June 11, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain, researchers have identified a sweet spot that operates in a disorderly way when simple sugars are introduced to people with insulin resistance, ...

Treatment of sleep apnea improves glucose levels in prediabetes

May 20, 2013
Optimal treatment of sleep apnea in patients with prediabetes improves blood sugar (glucose) levels and thus can reduce cardiometabolic risk, according to a study to be presented at the ATS 2013 International Conference in ...

Exercise-induced improvements in glycemic control and type 2 diabetes

July 1, 2013
Exercise-induced improvements in glycemic control are dependent on the pre-training glycemic level, and although moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can improve glycemic control, individuals with ambient hyperglycemia (high ...

Bile acid sequestrant reduces glucose concentration in T2DM

January 30, 2013
(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes taking metformin monotherapy, the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam reduces fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations without any effects on insulin concentration, secretion, ...

Insulin LY2605541 tops glargine for glycemic control in T1DM

January 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—For patients with type 1 diabetes, the novel, long-acting basal insulin LY2605541 yields greater improvement in glycemic control compared with insulin glargine, according to a study published online Nov. 27 ...

Recommended for you

A step closer to a cure for adult-onset diabetes

October 23, 2017
In healthy people, exosomes – tiny structures secreted by cells to allow intercellular communication – prevent clumping of the protein that leads to type 2 diabetes. Exosomes in patients with the disease don't have the ...

Diabetes pill might replace injection to control blood sugar

October 17, 2017
(HealthDay)— An injectable class of diabetes medication—called glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1—might one day be available in pill form, research suggests.

Skimping on sleep may contribute to gestational diabetes

October 17, 2017
The amount of time spent sleeping in the United States has dropped significantly in the past twenty years with almost a quarter of women and 16 percent of men experiencing insufficient sleep. Now, a new study has found that ...

Artificial pancreas performs well in clinical trial

October 16, 2017
During more than 60,000 hours of combined use of a novel artificial pancreas system, participants in a 12-week, multi-site clinical trial showed significant improvements in two key measures of well-being in people living ...

Omega-6 fats may help prevent type 2 diabetes

October 11, 2017
The risk of developing type 2 diabetes could be significantly reduced by eating a diet rich in omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, a new study suggests.

Where there's type 1 diabetes, celiac disease may follow

October 10, 2017
(HealthDay)—Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes need to be on the lookout for symptoms of another autoimmune condition—celiac disease, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.