Boy dies of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan

August 26, 2013

A teenage boy has died of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan, the country's health officials confirmed Monday, adding that an epidemic was not likely.

The 15-year-old was a herder from a small mountain village of Ichke-Zhergez in eastern Kyrgyzstan, close to the border with Kazakhstan and the Issyk-Kul lake.

He died last Thursday in the Karakol regional hospital, the ministry said in a statement.

"After a meeting of doctors, he was diagnosed with bubonic plague," the statement said. His body was cremated and remains were buried with special precautions.

"We suspect that the patient was infected with the plague through the bite of a flea," Tolo Isakov, a ministry official who heads the sanitation department, said at a briefing in Bishkek Monday.

The oriental rat flea carries the bubonic plague after biting an infected rodent and may then pass the disease to a human. Officials have dispatched two teams to the area to "catch, exterminate, and study rodents," Isakov said.

He added that the last recorded case of bubonic plague occurred in Kyrgyzstan 30 years ago.

Health Minister Dinara Saginbayeva aimed to dispel fears of an epidemic.

"There will not be a epidemic," she said. "The form of the disease in the teenager is not conducive to a . So there are no grounds for closing the borders."

Officials have hospitalised and isolated 105 people who have had contact with the deceased, including doctors and medical staff that treated the boy, the minister said. Doctors are also administering antibiotics in the area, she said.

Bubonic plague is a that is a strain of the "Black Death," a that killed tens of millions of people in 14th century Europe. Primarily an , it is extremely rare in humans.

Explore further: US approves new treatment for ancient plague

Related Stories

US approves new treatment for ancient plague

April 27, 2012
Hardly anyone succumbs to the bubonic plague these days, but US health authorities on Friday approved a new treatment for it and other forms of the potentially deadly bacterial infection.

7-year-old Colo. girl recovers from bubonic plague

September 5, 2012
(AP)—The parents of 7-year-old Sierra Jane Downing thought she had the flu when she felt sick days after camping in southwest Colorado.

Plague rare in U.S., surfacing in more affluent areas

June 13, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Although the plague is typically considered a remnant of the Middle Ages, when unsanitary conditions and rodent infestations prevailed amid the squalor of poverty, this rare but deadly disease appears to be ...

The plague: it's still with us

September 7, 2012
(HealthDay)—When Sierra Jane Downing's fever shot up to 107 degrees and she suffered a seizure, her parents knew their 7-year-old daughter had more than the flu.

Recommended for you

New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracks

December 7, 2017
Progressive kidney diseases, whether caused by obesity, hypertension, diabetes, or rare genetic mutations, often have the same outcome: The cells responsible for filtering the blood are destroyed. Reporting today in Science, ...

New Lyme disease tests could offer quicker, more accurate detection

December 7, 2017
New tests to detect early Lyme disease - which is increasing beyond the summer months -could replace existing tests that often do not clearly identify the infection before health problems occur.

Spinal tap needle type impacts the risk of complications

December 6, 2017
The type of needle used during a lumbar puncture makes a significant difference in the subsequent occurrence of headache, nerve irritation and hearing disturbance in patients, according to a study by Hamilton medical researchers.

Men with HPV are 20 times more likely to be reinfected after one year

December 5, 2017
A new analysis of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) in men shows that infection with one HPV type strongly increases the risk of reinfection with the same type. In fact, men who are infected with the type responsible for ...

New tuberculosis drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic

December 5, 2017
Tuberculosis, and other life-threatening microbial diseases, could be more effectively tackled with future drugs, thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by the University of Warwick and The Francis Crick Institute.

Scientists create successful mass production system for bioengineered livers

December 5, 2017
Researchers report creating a biologically accurate mass-production platform that overcomes major barriers to bioengineering human liver tissues suitable for therapeutic transplant into people.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.