Cancer control programs often don't address radon concerns

August 15, 2013
Cancer control programs often don't address radon concerns
Fewer than half of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program plans address radon-related activities, according to a study published in the Aug. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

(HealthDay)—Fewer than half of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program plans address radon-related activities, according to a study published in the Aug. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

Antonio Neri, M.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues reviewed 65 cancer plans created from 2005 to 2011 and categorized their radon-related activities as radon awareness, home testing, remediation, supporting radon policy activities, or policy evaluation. Alignment with existing radon-specific policies in each state was assessed.

The researchers found that 42 percent of the plans reviewed had radon-specific terminology. All 27 of these plans included improving radon awareness; home testing was included in 21; remediation in 11; support for radon policy activities in 13; and one included policy evaluation. Current engagement in radon activities was noted in three plans. Radon-specific laws were present in 30 states with most (21) related to radon professional licensure. Cancer plan activities were aligned with existing state radon laws in 11 states.

"Although several states have radon-specific policies, approximately half of cancer coalitions may not be aware of radon as a public health issue," the authors write. "Comprehensive Cancer Control-developed cancer coalitions and plans should prioritize to address but should consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs."

Explore further: Suggested link between radon and skin cancer

More information: Full Text

Related Stories

Suggested link between radon and skin cancer

November 14, 2011
A new study published this week suggests that a link may exist between radon exposure and non-melanoma skin cancer.

Low radon concentrations accurately measurable for the first time

July 24, 2013
You can't see it, you can't smell it, you can't taste it – but at high doses, it can be lethal: the natural radioactive noble gas radon occurs especially in places where the subsoil consists of granite. It can, however, ...

Recommended for you

Researchers identify gene variants linked to a high-risk children's cancer

September 25, 2017
Pediatric researchers investigating the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have identified common gene variants that raise the risk of an aggressive form of that disease. The discovery may assist doctors in better diagnosing ...

MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer

September 25, 2017
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between aggressive and slow-growing ...

Prostaglandin E1 inhibits leukemia stem cells

September 25, 2017
Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to results from a University of Iowa study in mice.

Cancer vaccines need to target T cells that can persist in the long fight against cancer

September 25, 2017
Cancer vaccines may need to better target T cells that can hold up to the long fight against cancer, scientists report.

Lung cancer treatment could be having negative health effect on hearts

September 25, 2017
Radiotherapy treatment for lung cancer could have a negative effect on the health of your heart new research has found.

Alternative splicing, an important mechanism for cancer

September 22, 2017
Cancer, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, arises from the disruption of essential mechanisms of the normal cell life cycle, such as replication control, DNA repair and cell death. Thanks to the advances ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.