A novel motion tracking system assesses functional rehabilitation of the upper limbs

August 5, 2013
A novel motion tracking system assesses functional rehabilitation of the upper limbs
The sensors were located on the trunk (1), the back of the head (2), the right arm (3), the forearm (4) and the hand (5). Credit: Neural Regeneration Research

Upper limb function impairment is one of the most common sequelae of central nervous system injury. Conventional assessment methods cannot provide objective evaluation of patient performance and the effectiveness of therapies.

The most common assessment tools are based on rating scales, which are inefficient when measuring small changes and can yield subjective bias. An objective quantification of patient performance during rehabilitation can be achieved using instruments to capture motion trajectories and specific details of task execution.

Various commercial systems use different to accurately track human motion. Electromagnetic motion capture systems have been widely used to track human movements in virtual reality applications. While the problem of marker occlusion does not arise with these systems, the electromagnetic fields they use are subjected to interference and are affected by metallic objects.

Ángel Gil-Agudo and colleagues from National Hospital for Spinal Cord Injury of Spain designed an inertial sensor-based monitoring system and developed a kinematic model with nine degrees of freedom to analyze upper limb and head movements in three dimensions. This system was then validated using a commercial optoelectronic system. These findings, published in the Neural Regeneration Research, suggest that an inertial sensor-based motion tracking system can be used in patients who have upper limb impairment through data integration with a virtual reality-based neurorehabilitation system.

Explore further: AANS: Brain machine interface can control prosthetic arm

More information: Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(19):1773-1782.

Related Stories

AANS: Brain machine interface can control prosthetic arm

May 2, 2013

(HealthDay)—A brain-machine interface can be used to control an anthropomorphic prosthetic arm with 10 degrees-of-freedom, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neurological ...

Recommended for you

Macrophages shown to be essential to a healthy heart rhythm

April 20, 2017

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)-led research team has identified a surprising new role for macrophages, the white blood cells primarily known for removing pathogens, cellular debris and other unwanted materials. In ...

Gut bacteria affect ageing

April 19, 2017

It loses its pigments, its motor skills and mental faculties decline, it gets cancer – the turquoise killifish (Nothobranchius furzeri) struggles with the same signs of old age that affect many other living creatures. Researchers ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.