International experts to explore new 'wonderdrug' at conference

September 2, 2013
International experts to explore new 'wonderdrug' at conference
The chemical structure of a Hydrogen Sulfide molecule. Credit: Shutterstock

A gas associated with the smell of rotten of eggs is now being proven to have widespread health benefits.

Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is widely known as a poisonous and , but now a mounting body of evidence suggests it could be used in a wide range of treatments for some of the biggest health problems of our time.

A conference hosted by the University of Exeter will bring together world-leading scientists to explore the emerging possibilities.

The conference will take place from September 8 to 11, and will discuss new research which shows that H2S can play a role in a diverse range of functions. They include reducing joint swelling, treating cancer, preeclampsia, neurodegenerative disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes and even helping plants grow in the dark.

On Sunday September 8 Professor Hideo Kimura will give an overview in the opening plenary entitled "Physiological Function of Hydrogen Sulfide and Beyond". The talk will take place at the Forum on the University's Streatham Campus. It starts at 6pm and is free to attend.

The conference is being organised by two world-leaders in H2S research, Professor Matt Whiteman, of the University of Exeter Medical School, and Dr Mark Wood, of Biosciences. Prof Whiteman said: "Scientists began to take a real interest in H2S when it was discovered that the body naturally produces small quantities of this seemingly dangerous substance. Since then researches from around the world have been intrigued by the potential benefits. It very much appears from the rapidly growing body of scientific and that H2S is emerging as something of a potential wonderdrug and could in fact hold the key to solving some of our most widespread health problems such as diabetes, , heart attacks and arthritis. The key to unlocking these benefits is using it in the right way."

The conference will hear addresses from a range of experts, from universities in countries including Japan, Singapore, the USA, Germany, Denmark and Canada. For more information, visit the conference website: www.exeter.ac.uk/eventexeter/h2s/

Explore further: Foul-smelling gas shows health benefits in reducing joint swelling

Related Stories

Foul-smelling gas shows health benefits in reducing joint swelling

April 29, 2013
A gas associated with the smell of rotten eggs has proven to effectively reduce joint swelling, in research which could lead to advances in the treatment of arthritis.

Natural gases a therapy for heart disease?

June 29, 2011
Research carried out by scientists from the Peninsula Medical School at the University of Exeter and the National University of Singapore has analysed the complex 'cross talk' between hydrogen sulphide (H2S ) and nitric oxide ...

Hydrogen sulfide: The next anti-aging agent?

January 29, 2013
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may play a wide-ranging role in staving off aging, according to a paper published online ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology. In this review article, a team from China explores ...

Recommended for you

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

App lets patients work alone or with others to prevent, monitor, and reverse chronic disease

July 24, 2017
Lack of patient adherence to treatment plans is a lingering, costly problem in the United States. But MIT Media Lab spinout Twine Health is proving that regular interventions from a patient's community of supporters can greatly ...

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring

July 21, 2017
A high-fat diet not only creates health problems for expectant mothers, but new research in an animal model suggests it alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of their offspring and has a long-term impact ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.