Okla. says hepatitis C was spread at dental clinic

September 18, 2013 by Justin Juozapavicius

Oklahoma health officials say a dentist's office shut down for unsafe practices last spring is responsible for the first known transmission of hepatitis C from one dental patient to another.

The state epidemiologist said Tuesday that genetic testing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed that the virus was passed at the Tulsa-area offices of Dr. W. Scott Harrington.

Health officials said the use of unsanitary equipment led to cross-contamination between patients.

But State Epidemiologist Dr. Kristy Bradley stressed that visits to the dentist remain safe.

Oklahoma in March asked that 7,000 of Harrington's patients be tested for infectious diseases. More than 4,000 patients were tested at state clinics. Only one patient-to-patient contamination was confirmed.

Explore further: HIV test urged for 7,000 US dental patients

Related Stories

HIV test urged for 7,000 US dental patients

March 28, 2013
(AP)—Health officials on Thursday urged an Oklahoma oral surgeon's patients to undergo hepatitis and HIV testing, saying filthy conditions behind his office's tidy facade posed a threat to his 7,000 clients and made him ...

Puerto Rico health official resigns after outbreak

September 14, 2013
(AP)—Puerto Rico's health secretary has resigned after officials revealed that a recent bacteria outbreak forced the temporary closure of a hospital's intensive care unit.

Surgical gear quarantined over rare brain disease

September 4, 2013
New Hampshire public health officials believe one person died of a rare, degenerative brain disease, and there's a remote chance up to 13 others in multiple states were exposed to it through surgical equipment.

57 children hospitalised in India after given wrong vaccine

September 16, 2013
Almost 60 children were taken to hospital in eastern India after they were mistakenly instructed to swallow a hepatitis B vaccine instead of polio drops, officials said Monday.

Baby boomers need hepatitis C test, CDC study confirms

August 15, 2013
(HealthDay)—Baby boomers—the generation known for sex, drugs and rock and roll—are the most likely Americans to develop hepatitis C, and too many of them aren't tested until it's too late to prevent liver damage, U.S. ...

Recommended for you

Onions could hold key to fighting antibiotic resistance

January 22, 2018
A type of onion could help the fight against antibiotic resistance in cases of tuberculosis, a UCL and Birkbeck-led study suggests.

New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed

January 22, 2018
A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria.

Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illness

January 22, 2018
A major review by UNSW researchers has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralysed children in the US, Canada and Europe.

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Flu may be spread just by breathing, new study shows; coughing and sneezing not required

January 18, 2018
It is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new University of Maryland-led study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.