Princeton to offer meningitis B vaccine to 6,000

November 26, 2013

Princeton University says a meningitis vaccine not yet licensed for use in the U.S. will be made available on campus starting Dec. 9 to nearly 6,000 students.

The Ivy League school has experienced an outbreak of type B meningococcal disease, which is sometimes life-threatening.

Seven Princeton students and one student visitor have been stricken by the bacterial illness since March.

Princeton said Tuesday that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has officially recommended all as well as graduate students living in dorms and the Graduate College and annexes receive the new vaccine. Vaccination is also recommended for employees with certain medical conditions.

The vaccine is licensed for use in Europe and Australia but not in the U.S. The Food and Drug Administration is allowing its use at Princeton.

Explore further: Princeton U. to give students meningitis B vaccine (Update 2)

Related Stories

Princeton U. to give students meningitis B vaccine (Update 2)

November 18, 2013
Princeton University officials decided Monday to make available a meningitis vaccine that hasn't been approved in the U.S. to stop the spread of the sometimes deadly disease on campus.

Princeton students safe to travel despite meningitis outbreak: CDC

November 26, 2013
(HealthDay)—Despite recent outbreaks of bacterial meningitis at Princeton University and the University of California, Santa Barbara, U.S. heath officials said Monday that students are safe to travel home for the Thanksgiving ...

Booster dose of new meningitis vaccine may be beneficial

September 23, 2013
A study of 4CMenB, a new vaccine to protect against meningitis B bacteria (which can cause potentially fatal bacterial meningitis in children), shows that waning immunity induced by infant vaccination can be overcome by a ...

EU drug regulator OKs Novartis' meningitis B shot

November 16, 2012
Europe's top drug regulator has recommended approval for the first vaccine against meningitis B, made by Novartis AG.

Study examines barriers to human papillomavirus vaccination among teens

November 25, 2013
Barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among adolescents in the U.S. range from financial concerns and parental attitudes to social influences and concerns about the vaccination's effect on sexual behavior, according ...

Recommended for you

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.