Cardiovascular complications, hypoglycemia common in older patients with diabetes

December 9, 2013

Cardiovascular complications and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) were common nonfatal complications in adults 60 years of age and older with diabetes, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Nearly half of the 24 million patients with mellitus in the United States are older than 60 years and that number is expected to double in the next two decades, according to the study background. Research suggests advancing age and the duration of time a patient has diabetes can predict complication and mortality rates from the disease.

Elbert S. Huang, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Chicago, and colleagues compared rates of and mortality across categories of age and how long a patient had diabetes. The study included 72,310 adults who were 60 years and older, had type 2 diabetes and were enrolled in Kaiser Permanente, a large health care delivery system.

Study findings indicate that among who had diabetes for a shorter duration (9 years or less), nonfatal cardiovascular complications had the highest incidence (, congestive heart failure, and cerebrovascular disease), followed by diabetic eye disease and acute hypoglycemic events. The incidence of nonfatal complications in older patients with diabetes for a longer duration (10 years or more) was similar, with rates for hypoglycemia similar to those of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease.

The results also indicate that in any age group had higher incidence of all outcomes (nonfatal complications and death) if they had diabetes for a longer, compared with shorter, duration of time.

"This four-year cohort study describes the clinical course of diabetes in older adults. These findings will be relevant and informative for clinicians, researchers and policymakers. … More important, the data from this study may inform the design and scope of public policy interventions that meet the unique needs of elderly patients with the disease," the authors conclude.

Explore further: First Nations adults have more than double the risk of end-stage kidney disease

More information: JAMA Intern Med. Published online December 9, 2013. DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.12956

Related Stories

First Nations adults have more than double the risk of end-stage kidney disease

December 2, 2013
First Nations adults with diabetes have more than double the risk of end-stage kidney disease compared with non–First Nations adults, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Women under 60 with diabetes at much greater risk for heart disease

October 31, 2013
Results of a Johns Hopkins study published today in the journal Diabetes Care found that young and middle-aged women with type 2 diabetes are at much greater risk of coronary artery disease than previously believed.

Clinical outcomes similar for elderly with PCI, CABG

August 27, 2013
(HealthDay)—For older patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease, clinical outcomes are similar with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), according to research ...

Poor people with diabetes may miss out on eye care

December 6, 2013
(HealthDay)—People with diabetes are at increased risk for eye problems, but a new study finds that poor diabetes patients who go to public hospital clinics have low rates of eye care.

Cardiovascular complications of type 2 diabetes associated with levels of physical activity

November 13, 2013
The risk of cardiovascular complications in people with type 2 diabetes is directly related to the frequency and duration of physical exercise, according to results of a large follow-up study reported today on World Diabetes ...

Lifestyle changes cut diabetes risk in high-risk patients

October 16, 2013
(HealthDay)—Comprehensive lifestyle interventions decrease the incidence of type 2 diabetes in high-risk patients, but the benefits are less clear in diagnosed patients, according to a review published in the Oct. 15 issue ...

Recommended for you

Scientists discover a new way to treat type 2 diabetes

July 21, 2017
Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit ...

Alzheimer's drug cuts hallmark inflammation related to metabolic syndrome by 25 percent

July 20, 2017
An existing Alzheimer's medication slashes inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome, a potential therapeutic intervention for a highly dangerous condition affecting 30 percent of adults in the ...

Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

One virus may protect against type 1 diabetes, others may increase risk

July 11, 2017
Doctors can't predict who will develop type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring.

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

July 7, 2017
For patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia - high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia - low blood sugar), says new research published ...

Researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes

July 7, 2017
Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.