FDA warns of dangerous erections from ADHD drugs

December 17, 2013 by The Associated Press

The Food and Drug Administration is warning that a stimulant used in treatments for the childhood condition attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder can trigger painful, long-lasting erections in rare cases.

The federal agency says it is updating to include information about priapism, a condition that can permanently damage a patient's penis.

The stimulant, methylphenidate (meth-ihl-PHEN'-ih-dayt), is found in treatments including Ritalin, Concerta and Daytrana.

ADHD is a common childhood disorder that hampers a child's ability to pay attention and control behavior. The FDA says the of patients taking methylphenidate who had priapism was 12 and a half years old.

The FDA says people should talk to their doctors before halting the drugs. Parents should talk to boys taking the drug so they are aware of .

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