Study indicates oral garlic not useful in treating vaginal thrush

December 17, 2013 by Liz Banks-Anderson

(Medical Xpress)—In a world-first study, led by the University of Melbourne and the Royal Women's Hospital, researchers have found garlic does not significantly reduce vaginal candida (thrush).

Led by University of Melbourne PhD candidate Cathy Watson also of the Royal Women's Hospital, the findings were published online in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

This study is the first to investigate the effect of oral garlic on vaginal colonisation of and provides another link in the chain of investigation of complementary and alternative therapies.

In a simple randomised double-blinded controlled trial, 63 women with candida were given three garlic tablets or placebo orally twice daily for fourteen days.

Results found a non-significant reduction in the amount of candida in women who were taking oral garlic tablets, compared with women taking placebo.

Ms Watson says the findings provide valuable information that support future trials involving more participants to demonstrate the effectiveness of oral garlic to treat thrush.

"Many have difficulty clearing thrush, and complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies are very popular.

"Our study shows more investigation should take place in this field and properly inform the public of the benefit of ," she said.

Despite the assumed benefits of garlic as an alternative therapy to treat vaginal candida, further studies are needed before it can be properly recommended.

Explore further: Garlic oil may ease adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiation

Related Stories

Garlic oil may ease adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiation

June 26, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Demand has grown recently to find more natural ways to reduce the adverse effects of the two major methods for cancer treatment, ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. A new study in the Journal of Food Science, ...

Brazil fights flatulence, with garlic

October 17, 2013
A Brazilian company said Wednesday it was bringing to market a garlic capsule designed to tackle flatulence.

Drinking milk can prevent garlic breath, study finds

February 5, 2013
If you're planning a romantic Italian dinner this Valentine's Day, you may want to consider drinking a glass of milk along with your meal. 

Aged garlic may ease cold symptoms

March 12, 2012
Cold and flu symptoms have a significant impact on our economy.

Recommended for you

Population health impact of infants born small for gestational age in low- and middle-income countries

August 18, 2017
In low-and middle-income countries, it is common for babies to be born of low birth weight, due to either inadequate growth in utero (fetal growth restriction) and/or preterm birth, (birth before 37 weeks gestation). Maternal ...

Hormone from fat tissue can give protection against polycystic ovary syndrome

August 10, 2017
Obesity and reduced insulin sensitivity are common in polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS. New research based on animal studies, and to be published in the journal PNAS, reveals that the hormone adiponectin can protect against ...

Study in mice may reveal insights into causes of miscarriages for some women

August 9, 2017
Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have identified how natural killer cells in the mouse placenta can cause a fetus to fail to grow in the womb or cause miscarriages.

Insomnia, sleep apnea nearly double the risk of preterm delivery before 34 weeks

August 9, 2017
Pregnant women who are diagnosed with sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia appear to be at risk of delivering their babies before reaching full term, according to an analysis of California births by researchers ...

Elective freezing of IVF embryos linked to higher pregnancy rates in some cases

August 1, 2017
A delay in transferring embryos to the mother improves the success of in vitro fertilization in certain cases, according to a study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Celmatix Inc. and several other ...

Negative birth outcomes linked to air pollution exposure early in pregnancy, study finds

July 27, 2017
Exposure to air pollution early in a pregnancy could increase risk for preterm birth and low birth weight, according to a study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine, and published on July 27 in Environmental Health ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.