First robotically assisted coronary stenting procedure performed at Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center

December 23, 2013 by Michelle Brubaker, University of California - San Diego

The interventional cardiology team led by Ehtisham Mahmud, MD, FACC, at UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (SCVC) has successfully completed the first two robotically-assisted coronary angioplasty/stent procedures in California. Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) now have access to this new technology that puts the precision of a robot in the hands of interventional cardiologists during procedures to open clogged heart arteries.

The CorPath System designed by Corindus Vascular Robotics (Natick, MA), offers interventional cardiologists unparalleled control in catheterization laboratories (cath labs) while performing coronary angioplasty and stenting.

"Sitting a few feet away from the patient's bedside at a computerized work station, I was able to navigate and advance the guidewire, balloon catheter and stent through the coronary artery. The ability to accurately measure lesion length with this technology enabled me to identify the exact length of the stents required and precisely place them," said Mahmud, chief of cardiovascular medicine and director of the SCVC-Medicine.

The first patient treated was a 66-year-old woman who had previously undergone graft surgery and required stenting of a 90 percent blockage in her native artery. The second patient was a 61-year-old man with a severe 95 percent blockage of his who presented with unstable angina.

CAD is characterized by plaque buildup that restricts blood flow in the arteries and is a widespread and life-threatening disease. In addition to medical therapy, angioplasty and stenting are the most common treatment for CAD. During the minimally invasive procedure, a tiny balloon is used to physically open an and help improve blood flow. Interventional cardiologists then use drug-eluting stents, wire metal mesh tubes, to prop open the arteries and keep them open following the procedure. There are nearly one million angioplasties performed annually in the nation.

The new robotic system acts as an "extra hand" that holds cardiac devices in place during the entirety of an interventional procedure. Furthermore, the entire procedure is performed with minimal radiation exposure to the operator, resulting in shorter procedure time and enables the delivery of cost-effective care.

"As the only comprehensive academic health system in the region, we are honored to be the first hospital in the state to deliver this technology to patients and the community," said Mahmud.

The interventional cardiovascular team at the SCVC, led by Mahmud, performs a high volume of complex interventional procedures and offers patients comprehensive, cutting edge treatment for the entire spectrum of cardiovascular disease.

Explore further: Fully dissolvable, temporary stent for opening heart artery blockages

Related Stories

Fully dissolvable, temporary stent for opening heart artery blockages

September 17, 2013
The Mount Sinai Medical Center is participating in the nationwide ABSORB III clinical trial testing the performance and potential clinical benefits of a fully dissolvable and temporary drug eluting stent to open heart artery ...

Angioplasty possibly no better than drug therapy

December 9, 2013
For patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who are not experiencing a heart attack and an abnormal stress test, treatment of their narrowed arteries by the common procedure of angioplasty may not provide additional ...

Cleveland Clinic study finds lowest risk treatment for severe carotid and coronary disease

July 31, 2013
Of the three most common treatment approaches for patients with severe carotid and coronary artery disease, patients who underwent stenting of the carotid artery followed by open heart surgery had the best outcomes, according ...

Results of the HYBRID trial presented

October 31, 2013
A hybrid approach to treating coronary artery disease that involves a "hybrid procedure" combining a minimally invasive bypass surgery with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was found to be feasible and safe in a clinical ...

Skip the balloon after placing carotid stent, surgeons suggest

December 11, 2013
Johns Hopkins surgeons say skipping one commonly taken step during a routine procedure to insert a wire mesh stent into a partially blocked carotid artery appears to prevent patients from developing dangerously low blood ...

Stroke risk higher after bypass than angioplasty: analysis

August 21, 2012
(HealthDay News) -- The potential for a stroke is far more common after a bypass than after angioplasty, new research reports, even though the risk after either heart procedure is still relatively low.

Recommended for you

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair

January 10, 2018
Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury - and getting them to stay there - remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal ...

Two simple tests could help to pinpoint cause of stroke

January 10, 2018
Detecting the cause of the deadliest form of stroke could be improved by a simple blood test added alongside a routine brain scan, research suggests.

Exercise is good for the heart, high blood pressure is bad—researchers find out why

January 10, 2018
When the heart is put under stress during exercise, it is considered healthy. Yet stress due to high blood pressure is bad for the heart. Why? And is this always the case? Researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular ...

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

January 10, 2018
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery ...

Place of residence linked to heart failure risk

January 9, 2018
Location. Location. Location.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.