States to get Medicaid cases from federal website

December 17, 2013 by Ann Sanner

Federal officials are working to send states the applications of Medicaid-eligible people who sought health insurance through the troubled new federally run marketplace.

Until now, the applications had not been forwarded to the as promised. The step is the latest in the effort to smooth the rollout of the marketplace.

The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says it's started transferring account information to 10 states. They are: Alabama, Delaware, Idaho, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Montana, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.

Ohio officials also say they are preparing to receive thousands of Medicaid applications not sent as expected because of technical glitches.

More than 800,000 people have been determined through the state and federal marketplaces to be eligible for Medicaid, the safety-net program for the poor and disabled.

Explore further: Fed site gives unusable Medicaid data

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