Risks associated with early-term delivery highlighted

January 7, 2014
Risks associated with early-term delivery highlighted

(HealthDay)—Non-medically indicated early-term delivery is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality, and interventions to reduce these deliveries are encouraged, according to a review published in the November issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Jani R. Jensen, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues discuss the neonatal and maternal consequences of early-term delivery and interventions to reduce these deliveries.

The authors note that neonatal mortality rates are significantly increased at 37 and 38 weeks versus 39 weeks (adjusted odds ratios, 1.9 and 1.4, respectively). Early delivery impacts the , with 1.9- and 1.3-fold higher cerebral palsy rates seen at 37 and 38 weeks, respectively, versus 39 to 41 weeks. Increases in the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Development Scale scores are seen with each additional week of gestation. Maternal complications include longer labor, more interventions during labor, and increased rates of Cesarean delivery, which is associated with underappreciated long-term sequelae. Many women are unaware of early-term delivery-associated risks and the age at which it is safe to deliver a baby; in one study, half of the women believed a full-term pregnancy occurred at 37 to 38 weeks. To decrease the number of non-medically indicated early-term deliveries, hospitals are using different approaches, including "hard-stop" policies, prohibiting this type of ; "soft-stop" approach, allowing individual physicians to decide on adherence; and education about associated risks—all of which can reduce early-term deliveries.

"Adoption and enforcement of policies to decrease the rate of elective early-term deliveries may reduce the frequency of these deliveries and, in turn, improve maternal and ," the authors write.

Explore further: Elective early-term deliveries increase complications for baby and mom, study says

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Elective early-term deliveries increase complications for baby and mom, study says

December 16, 2013
Enduring the last few weeks of pregnancy can be physically and emotionally challenging for some women. The aches and pains, the swelling of the limbs and the anxiety of when labor may start are part of the natural gestation ...

Elective induction at term tied to lower odds of cesarean

September 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—Compared with expectant management, elective induction at term (37 to 40 weeks of gestation) is associated with reduced likelihood of cesarean delivery, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Obstetrics ...

Study finds in women with prior cesarean, optimal gestational age for elective delivery is week 39

February 10, 2012
In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that for women with prior delivery via ...

Policy changes in elective delivery proven successful

February 11, 2013
In a study to be presented on February 14 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing changes in elective delivery ...

Vaginal delivery as safe as cesarean for most early preterm births

August 6, 2012
Vaginal delivery for early preterm fetuses presenting head first, or vertex presentation, had a high rate of success with no difference in neonatal mortality compared to cesarean delivery, a new study published in the American ...

Study shows national movement against non-medically indicated deliveries prior to 39 weeks

May 6, 2013
A national movement to eliminate non-medically indicated (NMI) delivery before 39 weeks has prompted nearly two-thirds of all U.S. hospitals handling non-emergency births to adopt specific policies against the practice, according ...

Recommended for you

Americans misinformed about smoking

August 22, 2017
After voluminous research studies, numerous lawsuits and millions of deaths linked to cigarettes, it might seem likely that Americans now properly understand the risks of smoking.

Women who sexually abuse children are just as harmful to their victims as male abusers

August 21, 2017
"That she might seduce a helpless child into sexplay is unthinkable, and even if she did so, what harm can be done without a penis?"

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep—and caffeine

August 18, 2017
Sleep is essential for good mental and physical health, and chronic insufficient sleep increases the risk for several chronic health problems.

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.