Formaldehyde levels in hair straighteners too high

January 23, 2014
Formaldehyde levels in hair straighteners too high

(HealthDay)—Formaldehyde concentrations in Brazilian keratin treatment hair straightening products may exceed recommended safety levels, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Mbulelo H. Maneli, Ph.D., from the University of Cape Town in South Africa, and colleagues utilized high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light detection after derivatization with dinitrophenylhydrazine to quantify formaldehyde concentrations in all Brazilian keratin treatment brands marketed in South Africa in 2012. The components of seven commercial brands were each tested three times.

The researchers found that six of the commercial brands tested had formaldehyde levels that ranged from 0.96 to 1.4 percent, and which exceeded the maximum safe concentration of formaldehyde set by the U.S. Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel of less than 0.2 percent. Five of these brands were labeled as -free.

"Formaldehyde concentrations in Brazilian keratin treatment products may exceed recommended levels and serve as a health hazard," the authors write. "Industry monitoring is needed to improve compliance and protection of hairdressers and consumers."

Explore further: Hair-straightening product may endanger stylists, clients

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Hair-straightening product may endanger stylists, clients

July 25, 2013
(HealthDay)—A popular hair-straightening product can pose a health threat to hairstylists and their customers, researchers say.

Researchers develop “net” nanodetector

August 1, 2011
Bin Ding and his team of researchers at Donghua University, Shanghai, China, have developed a new method of testing for formaldehyde using an electro-spinning netting technique. The process, described in their paper published ...

Beef sold in Zambia contained harmful chemical: govt

July 19, 2013
Beef products imported from Europe and distributed in Zambia by leading meat company Zambeef have tested positive for aromatic aldehyde, a chemical which can cause cancer, the health minister said Friday.

Recommended for you

New shoe makes running 4 percent easier, 2-hour marathon possible, study shows

November 17, 2017
Eleven days after Boulder-born Shalane Flanagan won the New York City Marathon in new state-of-the-art racing flats known as "4%s," University of Colorado Boulder researchers have published the study that inspired the shoes' ...

Vaping while pregnant could cause craniofacial birth defects, study shows

November 16, 2017
Using e-cigarettes during pregnancy could cause birth defects of the oral cavity and face, according to a recent Virginia Commonwealth University study.

Study: For older women, every movement matters

November 16, 2017
Folding your laundry or doing the dishes might not be the most enjoyable parts of your day. But simple activities like these may help prolong your life, according to the findings of a new study in older women led by the University ...

When vegetables are closer in price to chips, people eat healthier, study finds

November 16, 2017
When healthier food, like vegetables and dairy products, is pricier compared to unhealthy items, like salty snacks and sugary sweets, Americans are significantly less likely to have a high-quality diet, a new Drexel University ...

Children's exposure to secondhand smoke may be vastly underestimated by parents

November 15, 2017
Four out of 10 children in the US are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to the American Heart Association. A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that parents who smoke mistakenly rely on their own physical senses ...

How pomegranate extract alters breast cancer stem cell properties

November 15, 2017
A University at Albany research team has found evidence suggesting that the same antioxidant that gives pomegranate fruit their vibrant red color can alter the characteristics of breast cancer stem cells, showing the superfood's ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.