Massage enhances fat reduction with cryolipolysis

January 17, 2014
Massage enhances fat reduction with cryolipolysis
Post-treatment manual massage improves the efficacy of cryolipolysis on fat reduction, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Post-treatment manual massage improves the efficacy of cryolipolysis on fat reduction, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Gerald E. Boey, M.D., and Jennifer L. Wasilenchuk, from Arbutus Laser Centre in Vancouver, Canada, treated an efficacy group (10 patients) and a safety group (seven patients) on each side of the lower abdomen with a Cooling Intensity Factor of 42 (−72.9 mW/cm²) for 60 minutes. Immediately after treatment, one side of the abdomen was massaged, while the other side served as the control. Photos and ultrasound measurements were taken at baseline and at two and four months post-treatment in the efficacy group. To examine the effects of massage on subcutaneous tissue over time, histological analysis was completed through 120 days post-treatment in the safety group.

The researchers found that, compared with the non-massaged side, post-treatment manual massage correlated with a consistent and discernible increase in efficacy. Ultrasound measurements showed that the mean fat layer reduction was 68 and 44 percent greater at two and four months post-treatment, respectively, in the massage side versus the non-massage side. In histological analysis, there was no evidence of necrosis or fibrosis resulting from the massage.

"Post-treatment manual massage is a safe and effective technique to enhance the clinical outcome from a cryolipolysis procedure," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to ZELTIQ, which makes the CoolSculpting system and funded the study.

Explore further: Study shows massage reduces inflammation following strenuous exercise

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