Super Bowl Sunday may be risky for problem drinkers

January 31, 2014 by Cathy Wilde
Super Bowl Sunday may be risky for problem drinkers
New findings by the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions (RIA) indicate that men who are prone to problem drinking are especially at risk on Championship Day.

(Medical Xpress)—In recent years, Super Bowl Sunday has become as synonymous with parties, food and alcohol as it is with football.

Although most everyone enjoys a good party, new findings by the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions (RIA) indicate that men who are prone to problem are especially at risk on Championship Day.

"Our research shows that male at-risk drinkers report greater on Super Bowl Sunday as compared to a typical Saturday, which is, on average, the heaviest drinking day of the week," says Ronda Dearing, PhD, senior research scientist at RIA and lead author of the study.

"At risk" drinking is defined as five or more drinks per day for men or four or more drinks per day for women.

The study followed nearly 200 adult men and women over a three-year period. The participants, at the start of the study, had been identified as reporting "hazardous and harmful alcohol use."

In all three years, these at-risk men drank considerably more alcohol on Super Bowl Sunday than on typical Saturdays, whereas drinking by the at-risk women was significantly higher in only one of the three years.

"The potential for severe consequences associated with on Super Bowl Sunday, such as high rates of alcohol-involved traffic fatalities, indicates that this is an important public health concern that merits additional attention," Dearing says.

"Celebratory drinking is well-documented among young adults, but little is known about the phenomenon beyond young adulthood. It is important that further study is undertaken to learn more about the risk factors and negative consequences of celebratory drinking among adults," she says.

Explore further: Heavy drinking in middle age may speed memory loss by up to six years in men

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