AMA supports overhaul of Medicare doctors' pay

February 10, 2014

The American Medical Association says it strongly supports legislation that would change the way Medicare pays doctors, to emphasize quality care and not just sheer volume of services.

The endorsement Monday from AMA President Ardis Dee Hoven provided a boost for a bipartisan bill moving through Congress.

The bill would repeal the centerpiece of the current payment system. That approach relies on automatic cuts to to limit Medicare spending and has proven unworkable.

Instead, doctors would get five years of small increases while Medicare shifts its financial incentives to reward quality, cost-effective care. Doctors and other professionals would be encouraged to work in teams to keep patients as healthy as possible.

The strategy for passing it remains unclear; it's expected to cost about $130 billion over 10 years.

Explore further: Bills for SGR repeal pass senate, house committees

Related Stories

Bills for SGR repeal pass senate, house committees

December 16, 2013
(HealthDay)—The U.S. House Ways and Means Committee and the U.S. Senate Finance Committee have passed their versions of the bill to repeal Medicare's failed sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, according to a report from ...

AMA details top five federal issues for 2014

January 6, 2014
(HealthDay)—Implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the repeal of Medicare's failed sustained growth formula, and the proposed roll-out of the International Classification of Diseases, Version 10, top the list of federal ...

Repeal SGR formula and replace sequestration cuts internists tell Budget Conference Committee

October 25, 2013
Internists today provided input to the recently appointed Congressional Budget Conference Committee members, providing them with specific recommendations to reform Medicare physician payments and replace the sequestration ...

Chronic care overhaul proposed for Medicare

January 15, 2014
A bipartisan group of lawmakers is proposing a new approach to health care aimed at avoiding hospitalizations for older people, when possible.

Doctors say cutting food stamps could backfire

January 9, 2014
Doctors are warning that if Congress cuts food stamps, the federal government could be socked with bigger health bills.

Recommended for you

Sugar not so sweet for mental health

July 27, 2017
Sugar may be bad not only for your teeth and your waistline, but also your mental health, claimed a study Thursday that was met with scepticism by other experts.

Could insufficient sleep be adding centimeters to your waistline?

July 27, 2017
Adults in the UK who have poor sleep patterns are more likely to be overweight and obese and have poorer metabolic health, according to a new study.

Vitamin E-deficient embryos are cognitively impaired even after diet improves

July 27, 2017
Zebrafish deficient in vitamin E produce offspring beset by behavioral impairment and metabolic problems, new research at Oregon State University shows.

The role of dosage in assessing risk of hormone therapy for menopause

July 27, 2017
When it comes to assessing the risk of estrogen therapy for menopause, how the therapy is delivered—taking a pill versus wearing a patch on one's skin—doesn't affect risk or benefit, researchers at UCLA and elsewhere ...

Blowing smoke? E-cigarettes might help smokers quit

July 26, 2017
People who used e-cigarettes were more likely to kick the habit than those who didn't, a new study found.

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.