Which asthma drugs, dosages work best for African Americans?

February 19, 2014

The University of Illinois at Chicago has received funding from the National Institutes of Health to determine what combination and dosages of asthma medications works best to manage asthma in African Americans, who suffer much higher rates of serious asthma attacks, hospitalizations and asthma-related deaths than do white patients.

"We know that African Americans tend to have more difficulty with asthma compared to other groups," says Dr. Jerry Krishnan, associate vice president for and population health sciences at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System and principal investigator at the UIC study site. "Part of the reason is that we don't know which medications and in what combinations work best in African Americans to treat and prevent asthma symptoms. This study will help give us that information."

UIC is one of the 30 sites in 14 states taking part in the clinical trial Best African American Response to Asthma Drugs, or BARD. The trial will examine the effectiveness of different doses of inhaled corticosteroids used with or without the addition of a long-acting beta agonist in 500 African Americans age 5 and older.

Inhaled corticosteroids reduce inflammation and help control asthma in the long term, while long-acting beta agonists relax tight airway muscles. This study will compare multiple combinations of these medications and different dosing regimens to determine which works best for African American patients. The trial will also evaluate how genes may affect treatment response.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, African Americans are 20 percent more likely to have asthma than non-Hispanic whites. Chicago has a high incidence of asthma because of its large African American population.

"We're excited to be a part of this study because it aligns so well with the mission of our health system to reduce health disparities," said Krishnan, who is professor of medicine in the UIC College of Medicine. "Studies like BARD provide health data that will help us improve the lives of understudied populations that carry a disproportionate burden of disease.

Explore further: Rare genetic variations may account for severe reaction to LABA drugs in some people

Related Stories

Rare genetic variations may account for severe reaction to LABA drugs in some people

January 27, 2014
More than 25 million people in the United States have asthma, a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways causing recurring periods of wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and coughing.

Need relief from asthma? Communicating with your allergist is key

January 13, 2014
Can't find relief from your asthma symptoms? The way you communicate with your allergist can be the root of your problems. According to two papers published in the January issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, ...

Combined asthma medication therapy shown to reduce attacks

February 6, 2012
A Henry Ford Hospital study has found that using two types of common asthma medications in combination reduces severe asthma attacks.

1990s trial gave early danger signs for asthma drugs

November 25, 2012
The troubled history of asthma drugs known as long-acting beta-agonists goes back to the 1990s when a large clinical trial in Great Britain of the GlaxoSmithKline drug Serevent produced disturbing results.

Depressive symptoms linked to adult-onset asthma in African-American women

January 21, 2014
According to a new study from the Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) at Boston University, African-American women who reported high levels of depressive symptoms had a greater likelihood of adult-onset asthma compared to women ...

Stopping controversial asthma drugs could have downside: study

August 27, 2012
(HealthDay)—It's OK for some patients with asthma to stick with a combination of medications instead of abandoning one because of concerns about complications, a new analysis of existing research suggests.

Recommended for you

Targeting 'broken' metabolism in immune cells reduces inflammatory disease

July 12, 2017
The team, led by researchers at Imperial College London, Queen Mary University of London and Ergon Pharmaceuticals, believes the approach could offer new hope in the treatment of inflammatory conditions like arthritis, autoimmune ...

A perturbed skin microbiome can be 'contagious' and promote inflammation, study finds

June 29, 2017
Even in healthy individuals, the skin plays host to a menagerie of bacteria, fungi and viruses. Growing scientific evidence suggests that this lively community, collectively known as the skin microbiome, serves an important ...

Inflammatory bowel disease: Scientists zoom in on genetic culprits

June 28, 2017
Scientists have closed in on specific genes responsible for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) from a list of over 600 genes that were suspects for the disease. The team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators ...

Trials show unique stem cells a potential asthma treatment

June 28, 2017
A study led by scientists at Monash University has shown that a new therapy developed through stem cell technology holds promise as a treatment for chronic asthma.

Researchers find piece in inflammatory disease puzzle

May 23, 2017
Inflammation is the process by which the body responds to injury or infection but when this process becomes out of control it can cause disease. Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers, in collaboration with ...

Researchers reveal potential target for the treatment of skin inflammation in eczema and psoriasis

May 22, 2017
Superficially, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis may appear similar but their commonalities are only skin deep. Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is primarily driven by an allergic reaction, while psoriasis is considered ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.