British charity warns over Neknominate drinking craze

February 19, 2014

Health experts in Britain on Wednesday warned of the dangers of the online drinking game Neknominate, which has been blamed for several deaths.

The craze involves people filming themselves consuming large amounts of alcohol rapidly, then nominating someone to continue the game, and posting the video on Facebook.

Bradley Eames, 20, who died this month after consuming two pints of gin, is believed to be the fifth death in Britain and Ireland linked to Neknominate.

The Drinkaware charity, funded by the drinks industry, called on parents to take a tough stance against the game as fears rise that it could spread to younger teenagers.

Research suggests that children are more than twice as likely to consume an if they have felt encouraged to do so.

Drinkaware said more than a third of 10 to 17-year-olds who use have seen photographs of their friends drunk.

"I'm sure we can all remember feeling invincible as a child and keen not to be left out of the crowd, but as parents we know the real danger of a trend which encourages to take unnecessary risks and to put pressure on their friends to do the same," Drinkaware chief executive Elaine Hindal said.

"Parents have more influence than they think... It's never too early to talk to your children about the risks of drinking under age and to remind them that if they choose not to drink they will not be alone."

Hindal said parents should remind young people that the behaviour of some older teenagers taking part in social media drinkings games "is not something to be copied—it can have serious implications".

"We believe it's better to have the 'alcohol chat' in the living room than in A and E (the Accident and Emergency department of a hospital)."

Dr Sarah Jarvis, who advises Drinkaware, also warned of the danger of universities and prospective employers seeing online photographs of young people drunk.

Explore further: Why some mothers (wrongly) let kids try alcohol

Related Stories

Why some mothers (wrongly) let kids try alcohol

September 26, 2012
(HealthDay)—Many parents wrongly believe that allowing young children to taste alcohol may discourage them from drinking when they're teens, a new study finds.

Drunk driving not the only way alcohol leads to teen deaths, study says

April 17, 2013
(HealthDay)—Less than one-third of the 4,700 annual underage drinking-related deaths in the United States result from road crashes, according to a new study.

Best friends influence when teenagers have first drink

January 28, 2013
Chances are the only thing you remember about your first swig of alcohol is how bad the stuff tasted. What you didn't know is the person who gave you that first drink and when you had it says a lot about your predisposition ...

Society to blame for binge drinking

February 18, 2013
Peer pressure has long been blamed for binge drinking among teenagers, yet new research from Flinders University reveals it may not be the root of the problem.

Electronic Christmas gifts bear more responsibility for parents and kids

January 9, 2014
Smartphones, laptops, tablets and video games were happily crossed off the wish lists of many young children and teens this Christmas. But for parents, giving children electronic devices has to be about more than just saving ...

Recommended for you

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.