Physicians in India access UPMC medical expertise through telemedicine

February 21, 2014

With the latest expansion of its global telemedicine efforts, UPMC is now offering physicians in India access to its world-renowned medical expertise to improve care for patients. Through advanced, web-based technology, UPMC physicians specializing in oncology, pulmonology, colorectal surgery and other specialties are providing second opinions to physicians in the world's second-most populous nation.

Through a new agreement with TeleChikitsa Ventures, a private company based in Bangalore that assists Indian physicians seeking second opinions from other qualified physicians, UPMC's doctors are providing direct, physician-to-physician consultations. Using secure telemedicine applications, developed in part at UPMC's Technology Development Center, the physicians can share patient records and images and provide a consult to their Indian counterparts within 48 hours.

"UPMC's leadership in medicine and technology enables us to improve access to world-class care for throughout India," said Puneet Gurnani, president and chief executive of TeleChikitsa. "With just six doctors for every 10,000 people in India, innovative partnerships like this—which take advantage of rapidly spreading mobile networks—will be critical to ensuring a strong and healthy population in the years to come."

"Through advances in telemedicine, UPMC —without leaving their offices—can share their life-saving expertise with people almost anywhere in the world, regardless of time or distance," added Andrew Watson, M.D., chief medical information officer for UPMC's International and Commercial Services Division. "The result is a better, more efficient and more convenient health care system that better serves patients, no matter where they live."

This is UPMC's second agreement in India, where it already has assisted Citizens Hospital in Hyderabad with the creation of a clinical pathology laboratory. UPMC is helping Citizens to expand its advanced pathology capabilities, with the facility expected to become a reference lab serving patients throughout the Middle East.

Starting in western Pennsylvania more than a decade ago, UPMC's today encompasses more than 40 specialties and provides access to advanced care to hundreds of patients each year. UPMC telemedicine services are available in China, Kazakhstan, Singapore, Colombia, Mexico, Ireland and Italy, as well as western Pennsylvania, and are a vital part of UPMC Global Care, a program that helps international patients access UPMC's world-class care.

Explore further: AAFP: Telemedicine can help with increased demand for docs

Related Stories

AAFP: Telemedicine can help with increased demand for docs

February 17, 2014
(HealthDay)—Telemedicine offers a potential solution to the increased demand for physician-patient interaction, according to a report from a recent forum. The forum was hosted by the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies ...

Telemedicine represents enhanced care model

November 8, 2013
(HealthDay)—Telemedicine may represent an effective care model but there are associated concerns, specifically relating to reimbursement and legal issues, according to an article published Oct. 25 in Medical Economics.

Certain advanced breast cancer patients may benefit from surgery before other treatment, study finds

December 12, 2013
Patients newly diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and a solitary bone metastasis could benefit from surgery prior to other treatment, according to early results from a first-of-its kind clinical trial presented today ...

Telemedicine service may expand access to acute medical care, study finds

February 3, 2014
People who are younger, more affluent and do not have established health care relationships are more likely to use a telemedicine program that allows patients to get medical help—including prescriptions—by talking to ...

First 'breathing lung' transplant on East Coast using OCS lung

March 14, 2013
UPMC surgeons have performed a "breathing lung" transplant using a portable machine that provides a constant supply of blood and nutrients to the donor organs, which doctors say has the potential to keep them healthier and ...

Robots let doctors 'beam' into remote hospitals

November 17, 2013
(AP)—The doctor isn't in, but he can still see you now.

Recommended for you

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

App lets patients work alone or with others to prevent, monitor, and reverse chronic disease

July 24, 2017
Lack of patient adherence to treatment plans is a lingering, costly problem in the United States. But MIT Media Lab spinout Twine Health is proving that regular interventions from a patient's community of supporters can greatly ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.