Residents concerned about lack of time with patients

February 10, 2014
Residents concerned about lack of time with patients

(HealthDay)—Many U.S. medical residents are concerned about reduced face-time with patients and report that engaging patients in their own care is more challenging than anticipated, according to a report from the American Resident Project, sponsored by ThinkWellPoint.

To examine the issues that American residents face, the American Resident Project surveyed residents from across the country on various subjects, from to patient engagement.

According to the report, the third most pressing issue reported was reduced "face-time" with . Many residents reported greater challenge than anticipated in their ability to manage time with patients (62 percent) and in engaging patients in their own care (53 percent). Most residents (80 percent) agreed that care coordination could improve , with the top benefit of coordinated care being the ability to better educate patients about prevention and disease management. Nearly half of residents (46 percent) agreed that the physician workforce shortage is likely to be the greatest challenge in helping to meet the needs of newly-insured patients.

"Most residents work in team-based settings and believe their medical school training prepared them well for working in this environment," according to the report. "More than one-third of residents view policies that promote team-based models as critical for improving care coordination within the system."

Explore further: More family medicine residency spots but shortfall remains

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