AMA introduces medical education initiative

March 26, 2014
AMA introduces medical education initiative

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association's (AMA) Accelerating Change in Education initiative is being introduced in 11 medical schools in an effort to shift the focus of education toward real-world practice and competency assessment, according to an AMA report.

Noting that students and doctors often rely on "rule of thumb," which can present inherent biases, the AMA's Accelerating Change in Education Initiative is being implemented in 11 medical schools that received grants from the AMA. The initiative will focus on changing medical education to be based more in real-world practice and assessments of competency. The focus of medical education will be shifted toward , concentrating on chronic care, teamwork, population health, and community.

According to the report, the participating medical schools will adapt their curriculum so that medical students will be able to identify and address current system failures and contribute to a culture emphasizing safety and improvement. In addition, students will function as active members of interprofessional teams. They will also pose clinical questions and advance patient care by retrieving high-quality evidence.

"The physician of the future will have the remarkable ability to reflect on their biases," Mark Quirk, Ed.D., AMA vice president of outcomes, said in a statement. "These schools will make authentic learning accessible."

Explore further: AMA grants curriculum efforts to address health disparities

More information: More Information

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