China cracks down on medication of schoolchildren (Update)

March 18, 2014

China's education ministry ordered a nationwide investigation on Tuesday into whether schools are giving students medication without permission after a protest by parents of kindergarteners who were given an antiviral drug.

The announcement came a week after an angry protest by parents whose children were given the drug in the city of Xi'an. Some children suffered stomach pain, dizziness and other symptoms but authorities say it is unclear whether it was linked to the drug.

Police in Xi'an said two kindergartens gave children the medication to improve attendance rates and boost their incomes. Police said they have detained suspects and are determining how extensively the medication was used.

A kindergarten in the northeastern city of Jilin also was found to be giving the drug to students.

Authorities shut down a kindergarten in the central city of Yichang after its president admitted giving pupils an over-the-counter anti-fever drug and vitamins to boost immunity and improve attendance, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

The scandals have raised public concerns over the safety and health of schoolchildren.

Explore further: Youngest kindergarteners most likely to be held back, study finds

Related Stories

Youngest kindergarteners most likely to be held back, study finds

March 4, 2014
For some parents, the decision of when to enroll their children into kindergarten can result in costly consequences such as another year of daycare expenses. In general, children must be five years old to be eligible to be ...

One in ten teens using 'study drugs,' but parents aren't paying attention

May 20, 2013
As high schoolers prepare for final exams, teens nationwide may be tempted to use a "study drug"—a prescription stimulant or amphetamine—to gain an academic edge. But a new University of Michigan poll shows only one in ...

US warns about use of codeine in children

August 15, 2012
(AP) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned physicians and caregivers on Wednesday about the risks of giving the pain reliever codeine to children who have just had surgery to treat obstructive sleep apnea.

Chinese police say Glaxo employees bribed doctors

July 11, 2013
China's police ministry accused executives of pharmaceutical supplier GlaxoSmithKline on Thursday of conducting a large and long-running bribery campaign to persuade doctors to prescribe drugs.

Recommended for you

In most surgery patients, length of opioid prescription, number of refills spell highest risk for misuse

January 17, 2018
The possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse has occupied the attention of a nation in the throes of an opioid crisis looking for ways to stem what experts have dubbed an epidemic. ...

Patients receive most opioids at the doctor's office, not the ER

January 16, 2018
Around the country, state legislatures and hospitals have tightened emergency room prescribing guidelines for opioids to curb the addiction epidemic, but a new USC study shows that approach diverts attention from the main ...

FDA bans use of opioid-containing cough meds by kids

January 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—Trying to put a dent in the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday slapped strict new restrictions on the use of opioid-containing cold and cough products by kids.

Taking ibuprofen for long periods found to alter human testicular physiology

January 9, 2018
A team of researchers from Denmark and France has found that taking regular doses of the pain reliever ibuprofen over a long period of time can lead to a disorder in men called compensated hypogonadism. In their paper published ...

Nearly one-third of Canadians have used opioids: study

January 9, 2018
Nearly one in three Canadians (29 percent) have used "some form of opioids" in the past five years, according to data released Tuesday as widespread fentanyl overdoses continue to kill.

Growing opioid epidemic forcing more children into foster care

January 8, 2018
The opioid epidemic has become so severe it's considered a national public health emergency. Addiction to prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone and morphine, has contributed to a dramatic rise in overdose deaths and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.