Dr. Dwight Rouse addresses rapid increase in cesarean birth rates

March 6, 2014

In 2011, one in three pregnant women in the U.S. delivered babies by cesarean delivery. While cesarean delivery may be life-saving for the mother, the baby or both, the rapid increase in cesarean birth rates since 1996 without clear indication raises concerns that this type of delivery may be overused.

Dwight J. Rouse, MD, MSPH, a specialist in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island and a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, has co-authored the first in a new, joint series called "Obstetric Care Consensus" that is being introduced by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM).

This inaugural issue, "Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery," addresses the rapid increase in cesarean birth rates and outlines a multifaceted approach that addresses indications for primary cesarean delivery.

"There is no doubt that there is a time and a place for a cesarean delivery. But we need to be sure that, as part of general obstetric practice, we are not overusing this tool for fear or convenience, particularly primary cesarean delivery," said Dr. Rouse. "It is important for health care providers to understand the short-term and long-term risks and benefits of cesarean and vaginal delivery, as well as safe and appropriate opportunities to prevent overuse of cesarean delivery."

This consensus outlines a multifaceted approach that addresses indications for primary cesarean delivery, including labor dystocia (abnormal or difficult labor), abnormal or indeterminate (formerly referred to as "nonreassuring") fetal heart rate tracing, fetal malpresentation (not head down in the birth canal), multiple gestation, and suspected fetal macrosomia (very large baby).

Dr. Rouse continued, "Childbirth, by its very nature, carries potential risks for a woman and her baby, regardless of the delivery method. We are hopeful that this information will offer obstetric providers guidelines to ensure the safest delivery possible for all women."

Explore further: Maternal-fetal medicine professionals identify ways to reduce first cesarean

More information: www.acog.org/Resources_And_Pub … ry_Cesarean_Delivery

Related Stories

Maternal-fetal medicine professionals identify ways to reduce first cesarean

January 24, 2014
A recently published article, based on a workshop, Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, ...

Fewer attempted labors drive increase in cesarean rate

December 4, 2013
(HealthDay)—Increases in the primary cesarean delivery rate appear to be driven by changes in rates of attempted labor as well as changes in rates of labor success, according to research published in the December issue ...

Researchers pinpoint reasons for dramatic rise in C-sections

June 22, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- In one of the first studies to examine the reasons for the rising number of women delivering their babies by cesarean section, Yale School of Medicine researchers found that while half of the increase ...

Around-the-clock labor coverage associated with decrease in C-section

February 11, 2013
In a study to be presented on February 16 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest around-the-clock labor and delivery ...

First-time Cesarean rates dipped in 2012, CDC reports

January 23, 2014
(HealthDay)—Efforts to curb cesarean birth rates in the United States might be working, with health officials reporting a 2 percent decline in the number of first-time surgical deliveries between 2009 and 2012.

Elective induction at term tied to lower odds of cesarean

September 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—Compared with expectant management, elective induction at term (37 to 40 weeks of gestation) is associated with reduced likelihood of cesarean delivery, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Obstetrics ...

Recommended for you

Women exposed to smoke while in womb more likely to miscarry

July 13, 2017
Women exposed to cigarette smoke while in their mothers' wombs are more likely to experience miscarriage as adults, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen.

Lack of a hormone in pregnant mice linked to preeclampsia

June 30, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers from Singapore, the Netherlands and Turkey has isolated a hormone in pregnant mice that appears to be associated with preeclampsia—a pregnancy-related condition characterized by ...

Aspirin reduces risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

June 28, 2017
Taking a low-dose aspirin before bed can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, which can cause premature birth and, in extreme cases, maternal and foetal death.

The biology of uterine fluid: How it informs the fetus of mom's world

June 22, 2017
A developing fetus bathes in a mixture of cellular secretions and proteins unique to its mother's uterus. Before fertilization, the pH of uterine fluid helps create a conducive environment for sperm migration, and afterward, ...

New clues in puzzle over pre-eclampsia and cholesterol regulation

June 21, 2017
Scientists studying a mystery link between the dangerous pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia and an increased risk of heart disease in later life for both mother and child have uncovered important new clues.

Are maternal hormones different when carrying a boy or a girl?

June 15, 2017
With advances in prenatal testing it's now possible to find out whether a pregnancy will result in a male or female baby as early as eight weeks' gestation.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.