We're happy to have pharmacists give us flu jabs and vaccines, but not our kids

March 26, 2014 by Niki Widdowson
We’re happy to have pharmacists give us flu jabs and vaccines, but not our kids

(Medical Xpress)—Queenslanders will save time and money in a unique trial by Australian pharmacists delivering flu shots for the first time.

Dr Gary Mortimer, from QUT Business School and pharmacist, Dr Vincent Chan from QUT's School of Clinical Sciences are examining levels of consumer and risk in their dealings with community pharmacies.

"One aspect of our study is identifying whether would be receptive to pharmacists administering flu shots and vaccinations," Dr Mortimer said.

QUT consumer behaviour expert Dr Gary Mortimer said the trial was launched this week across Queensland.

"This is a great program and will be welcomed by consumers as a recently completed survey of more than 400 Australian shoppers showed they would trust their pharmacist to dispense flu shots and travel vaccinations.

"The results show that almost 60 per cent of respondents indicated they would trust their pharmacist to give them their annual flu jab and considered it convenient."

Dr Mortimer also asked consumers if they would trust their pharmacist to dispense travel vaccinations also, finding that nearly 55 per cent of respondents said they would.

"However, when it comes to children, it appears consumers are more cautious," Dr Mortimer said.

"The results indicate that only about 40 per cent of mothers would feel comfortable in allowing a pharmacist to give their children a vaccination.

"Fathers, on the other hand, appeared more open to the idea, with 52 per cent advising they would take their kids to see a for a vaccination."

Dr Mortimer said community pharmacies played an important role in the Australian healthcare system.

"There are approximately 5000 community pharmacies in Australia, employing more than 12,000 university-qualified pharmacists and approximately 30,000 trained pharmacy assistants," he said.

Explore further: Half of at-risk flu patients are still not vaccinated

Related Stories

Half of at-risk flu patients are still not vaccinated

February 3, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—A new study by The University of Nottingham and Boots UK reveals community pharmacy can play an important role in getting more at-risk patients vaccinated against flu, including those with diabetes and ...

Increased role of pharmacists—safer medication use

September 4, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Researchers at The University of Queensland's School of Pharmacy are making medication use safer by incorporating pharmacists into general practice medical centres.

Role of pharmacists in GPs crucial

November 1, 2013
New research has shown a role for pharmacists within general practice (GP) clinics is a key solution to help prevent medication errors by patients and health professionals.

Recommended for you

Cancer drugs' high prices not justified by cost of development, study contends

September 12, 2017
(HealthDay)— Excusing the sky-high price tags of many new cancer treatments, pharmaceutical companies often blame high research and development (R&D) costs.

Non-psychotropic cannabinoids show promise for pain relief

September 4, 2017
Some cancers love bone. They thrive in its nutrient-rich environment while gnawing away at the very substrate that sustains them, all the while releasing inflammatory substances that cause pain—pain so severe that opioids ...

Fentanyl drives rise in opioid-linked deaths in U.S.

August 31, 2017
(HealthDay)—Fentanyl, a synthetic narcotic, is a key player in America's continuing epidemic of opioid-related overdose deaths, two new studies report.

Eating triggers endorphin release in the brain

August 28, 2017
Finnish researchers have revealed how eating stimulates brain's endogenous opioid system to signal pleasure and satiety.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious disease

August 21, 2017
That statin you've been taking to lower your risk of heart attack or stroke may one day pull double duty, providing protection against a whole host of infectious diseases, including typhoid fever, chlamydia, and malaria.

Data revealed under FOI shows benefits of multiple sclerosis drug currently blocked by regulators

August 17, 2017
A drug that is blocked by the EU regulatory system has now been found to improve the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.