Spain patient gets pneumonia by e-cigarettes: hospital

March 13, 2014
Credit: TheNorlo/Wikipedia

A patient in Spain caught pneumonia from smoking an electronic cigarette too much, the second ever recorded case of lung illness from the devices, the hospital treating him said Thursday.

The patient, identified by media as a man aged 50, was admitted in the northwestern city of A Coruna for a separate illness and came down with the lung complaint while there, a source at the hospital told AFP.

"He was diagnosed with exogenous lipoid caused by an excessive use of electronic cigarette," said the source at the A Coruna University Hospital, who asked not be named.

The disease was caused by a vegetable-based ingredient in the replaceable cartridges that produce the vapour for inhalation, the source added.

Doctors diagnosed the pneumonia "a few days ago" and the patient has since been cured and discharged, the source said.

"According to the medical journals, it is the second case in the world of a breathing complaint related to consumption of ."

The US specialist medical journal Chest in April 2012 recorded the case of a 42-year-old woman who also caught pneumonia from using e-cigarettes.

Makers of e-cigarettes say they are much less harmful than tobacco and can help people give up smoking. They brushed off the case in A Coruna.

"There is no proof that this illness was linked to use of an electronic cigarette," said Alejandro Rodriguez, vice-president of the National Electronic Cigarette Association, which represents 500 companies active in Spain.

"How many people die every day from smoking? If in the 15 years that e-cigarettes have been around only two people in the world have caught light pneumonia from this product, we should say well done to it," he told AFP.

The battery-powered devices deliver a puff of nicotine vapour in a variety of possible flavours, minus many of the toxic chemicals present in tobacco.

They are becoming an increasingly popular alternative to tobacco but experts have yet to determine how harmful they may be to people's health.

Experts at a conference in London last November said about seven million Europeans have turned to e-cigarettes in the past four years.

In December, the European Union agreed to regulate the e-cigarette market and Spain said it would ban them from public places like hospitals and schools.

In the United States, lawmakers in the cities of New York and Los Angeles have voted to ban e-cigarettes in public.

Explore further: Spain to ban e-cigarettes in hospitals, schools

Related Stories

Spain to ban e-cigarettes in hospitals, schools

December 18, 2013
Spain will ban electronic cigarettes from public places like hospitals and schools because of their possible health risks, the government said Wednesday.

Los Angeles bans e-cigarettes in public places

March 5, 2014
Los Angeles lawmakers voted Tuesday to ban e-cigarette use in public places where tobacco smoking is prohibited, including work places, restaurants and bars.

Role of E-cigarettes in eliminating tobacco use discussed

December 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—The public health issues relating to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and their role in eliminating tobacco use are discussed in a perspective piece published online Dec. 18 in the New England Journal of ...

E-cigarettes: Gateway to nicotine addiction for US teens, says study

March 6, 2014
E-cigarettes, promoted as a way to quit regular cigarettes, may actually be a new route to conventional smoking and nicotine addiction for teenagers, according to a new UC San Francisco study.

Doctors express a strong desire to learn more about e-cigarettes

February 21, 2014
The use of electronic cigarettes, battery operated devices that often look like cigarettes and deliver vaporized nicotine, is on the rise, including among minors. In a survey between 2011 and 2012, 10 percent of high school ...

Europe and electronic cigarettes

June 1, 2013
France said on Friday it would apply the same bans to electronic cigarettes as it does to tobacco but would not completely outlaw the popular smokeless product.

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.