Measles cases linked to US adoptions of Chinese children, CDC reports

April 10, 2014
Measles cases linked to U.S. adoptions of chinese children: CDC
The highly infectious illness is still endemic in China, so adopted kids should get their shots, experts say.

(HealthDay)—A series of measles cases in the United States involving children adopted from China highlights the importance of vaccinations for any adopted child from overseas, a new report reveals.

While measles was declared eliminated from the United States in 2000, cases still occur when infected people arrive in the country.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, China is the leading source of adopted in the United States, accounting for 30 percent of foreign-born children adopted in 2012. Measles is still a health concern in China, with a rate of just under 3 cases per 100,000 people in the first months of 2013.

The U.S. outbreaks—occurring in Minnesota, Missouri and Washington state—began in July 2013 when two adopted Chinese children were diagnosed with measles shortly after their arrival. Further investigation by local and state identified two more measles cases, one involving a family member of one of the adopted children and another involving another newly adopted child from China.

All of the adopted children with measles were 2 years old, had cerebral palsy, and had not been vaccinated against measles, according to a team led by CDC investigator Dr. Edith Nyangoma.

Two of the adopted children had measles symptoms and were contagious while flying to the United States, potentially exposing other airline passengers and crew to measles, the CDC noted. However, follow-up investigation by health officials found that none of the other people on those flights developed measles.

Other recent U.S. outbreaks have also been caused by children adopted from overseas, including two among adopted Chinese children in 2004 and 2006, the CDC said.

Ensuring that adopted children from other countries have received all their recommended shots can prevent the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles, Nyangoma's team said.

The CDC said it is working with Chinese health officials to reduce the risk of being carried from China to the United States.

The study is published in the April 11 issue of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Explore further: US measles tally already among worst in 15 years

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about measles.

Related Stories

US measles tally already among worst in 15 years

September 12, 2013
(AP)—Health officials say 2013 already is one of the worst years for measles in more than 15 years.

California officials warn of measles exposure

February 14, 2014
San Francisco Bay Area officials say a University of California, Berkeley, student infected with measles could have exposed thousands of others by attending classes and riding public transit.

Vaccine coverage high in U.S., but measles outbreaks a concern: CDC

September 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—Vaccination rates among America's children remain high, despite a serious resurgence of measles among unvaccinated children and adults, health officials reported Thursday.

Europe is big threat to resurgence of measles in US, experts say

December 5, 2013
A resurgence of measles in Europe was blamed Thursday for a spike in cases in the United States, raising concern about parents' refusal to vaccinate children against the highly contagious virus.

Timing of first dose of measles vaccine questioned

October 21, 2013
(HealthDay)—Children who receive the first dose of a two-dose schedule of measles vaccine at 12 to 13 months compared with 15 months or later have a greater risk of developing measles, according to a study published online ...

US eliminated measles for 10 years, but risks remain

December 5, 2013
Measles has all but disappeared from the United States for the past decade but risks a comeback due to a growing number of parents who refuse to vaccinate children, experts said Thursday.

Recommended for you

New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed

January 22, 2018
A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria.

Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illness

January 22, 2018
A major review by UNSW researchers has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralysed children in the US, Canada and Europe.

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Flu may be spread just by breathing, new study shows; coughing and sneezing not required

January 18, 2018
It is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new University of Maryland-led study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.