Plantar-pressure based orthoses reduce foot ulcer recurrence

May 1, 2014
Plantar-pressure based orthoses reduce foot ulcer recurrence

(HealthDay)—Patient-specific orthoses manufactured on the basis of foot shape and barefoot plantar pressure are better compared to those manufactured only on the basis of foot shape and clinical insight, according to a study published online April 23 in Diabetes Care.

Jan S. Ulbrecht, M.D., from Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and colleagues randomized patients to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental; 66 patients) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control; 64 patients). Over 15 months of follow-up, were assessed for a composite primary end point of forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion.

The researchers observed a trend toward the composite primary end point in favor of the experimental orthoses. There was a significant difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007), but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). The ulcer prevention benefit of the experimental orthoses was significant (P = 0.003) at 180 days. Over the study period, the hazard ratio was 3.4 for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm.

"We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure-based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the orthotic industry.

Explore further: Botox beats steroids for painful foot condition, plantar fasciitis

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Botox beats steroids for painful foot condition, plantar fasciitis

January 17, 2013
Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent cause of chronic heel pain, leaving many sufferers unable to put their best foot forward for months at a time. Now a Mexican study suggests that physicians should turn to Botox rather ...

Some answers about orthotics: Researchers examine effectiveness of shoe inserts

November 1, 2011
It's one of those mysteries that has baffled runners and running doctors for decades: Why do orthotics work?

High BMI tied to non-specific foot pain, plantar heel pain

April 23, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Increased body mass index (BMI) correlates with non-specific foot pain in the general population, and with chronic plantar heel pain in a non-athletic population, according to a meta-analysis published online ...

Recommended for you

Alzheimer's drug cuts hallmark inflammation related to metabolic syndrome by 25 percent

July 20, 2017
An existing Alzheimer's medication slashes inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome, a potential therapeutic intervention for a highly dangerous condition affecting 30 percent of adults in the ...

Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

One virus may protect against type 1 diabetes, others may increase risk

July 11, 2017
Doctors can't predict who will develop type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring.

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

July 7, 2017
For patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia - high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia - low blood sugar), says new research published ...

Researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes

July 7, 2017
Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics

Immune system killer cells increase risk of diabetes

July 6, 2017
More than half of the German population is obese. One effect of obesity is to chronically activate the immune system, placing it under continuous stress. Researchers in Jens Brüning's team at the Max-Planck-Institute for ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.