Salmonella linked to chicken ongoing, 524 sickened

May 28, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

An outbreak of antibiotic-resistant salmonella linked to a California chicken company continues even after more than a year.

There have been 50 new illnesses in the past two months. Since March 2013, 574 people have been sickened.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there are about eight new reported salmonella illnesses linked to the a week—most of them in California.

So far, there's been no recall of Foster Farms chicken.

The Agriculture Department is monitoring Foster Farms facilities and says measured rates of salmonella in the company's products have been going down since the outbreak began.

The department threatened to shut down the facilities last year but let Foster Farms stay open after the company had made immediate changes to reduce salmonella rates.

Explore further: USDA: Poultry plants linked to outbreak stay open

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