The effect of anxiety, adrenaline and fatigue for a football player

June 24, 2014

Some of the most common injuries in football players are violent joint sprains and muscle strains in the legs, which are sometimes caused by anxiety and fatigue accumulated after several games in a few weeks.

To verify that these are the most common injuries, a study in Britain, where 91 professional teams were evaluated during a tournament and recorded 6,030 lesions, of which 23 percent were in the thighs and 17 were performed in knees or ankles.

Regarding this issue, a pair of specialists agreed that inside the organism, reactions occur in which various natural substances in the body are involved. Alonso Fernández Guasti, from the Mexican Center for Research and Advanced Studies, explained that the level of anxiety and stress in the player increases during the course of the game.

Pedro Cosculluela, sports medicine specialist at Methodist Hospital in Houston, said that when the player achieves a high level of fatigue, it weakens its body and leads to decrease the reaction time for auditory, visual and mobility levels in response to basic plays; players in these situations become more prone to injury.

Some of these injuries are ankle sprains and tears, which occur when the muscle does not have the strength necessary to counteract a force from an action in the game like a shot for a goal, where the weight of the body rests on the ankle during the kickstand, which loses stability and can damage the ligament.

Fernandez Guasti explained that the player often has strange behavior, like retracting, due to rising stress and anxiety accumulated during the game, but this condition can cause injury.

During this process the brain releases large doses of neurotransmitters, such as adrenaline and noradrenaline hormones, whose function is to focus the player, but a consequence of this action is to place an excessive alert mode.

The specialist in musculoskeletal conditions at Houston, noted that when the player gets tired, there is a loss of minerals and chemicals in the blood that cause muscle cramps, whose purpose is to warn the body of a possible injury if it continues to strive to that extent.

Also, the player's body temperature and circumstances of the field are also factors influencing the performance of the player, for example, during a 90 minute run players sweat chemicals and minerals such as sodium, potassium and chlorine, which cannot be recovered by only drinking water.

To avoid injury in the player, the specialist suggested that as soon as the cramp presents the player should be called to administer the required dose of saline solutions in order to restore the minerals and chemicals that were lost due to physical exertion.

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gzurbay
not rated yet Jun 25, 2014
It is a damn site more likely that muscle overuse syndrome is resulting in muscles with hypertonus, - and this partial contraction due to overactive muscle spindle cells is in effect reducing the potential to do work ( lost contraction potential ). If the athlete is performing at maximum, but muscle competence has been reduced a percentage - movement stability will likely suffer.

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