Nutritionist offers advice on vitamins, dietary supplements

June 13, 2014 by Lindsey Elliott

Before taking a daily vitamin or dietary supplement, you might want to think about what you're really consuming, says a Kansas State University human nutritionist.

"Supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration like other drugs are regulated, which is something I think a lot of people don't realize," said Brian Lindshield, assistant professor of human nutrition.

Lindshield researches supplements to see if the listed on the label actually match what is found in the bottle. His recent research found that prostate supplements, which may reduce the risk of , are usually true to the label.

"Our research found that the prostate supplements that listed the ingredients on the bottle were the ones that generally contained those ingredients," Lindshield said.

If you want to get the most accurate product, Lindshield says look for the bottles with the more descriptive labels. Also, paying a little extra will usually get you the ingredients you are seeking.

"You should probably avoid buying the cheapest supplement available because if the manufacturer is cutting corners to get the price really cheap, they probably are not going through the same amount of standard that the manufacturers of more expensive products are," Lindshield said.

Another tip: Don't expect supplements to make up for a bad diet.

"Vitamins and minerals will prevent deficiency, but it's not going to make up for a lot of the chronic disease risks that come with an unhealthy diet," Lindshield said.

Explore further: Eating smart: Researcher studies foods, dietary supplements that may reduce risk of prostate cancer

Related Stories

Eating smart: Researcher studies foods, dietary supplements that may reduce risk of prostate cancer

January 23, 2012
A Kansas State University professor is turning to nutrition to tackle prostate cancer.

NIH launches Dietary Supplement Label Database

June 18, 2013
Researchers, as well as health care providers and consumers, can now see the ingredients listed on the labels of about 17,000 dietary supplements by looking them up on a website. The Dietary Supplement Label Database, free ...

Analysis finds vitamin D potency varies widely in dietary supplements

February 11, 2013
Vitamin D supplement potency varies widely, and the amount of vitamin D in over-the counter and compounded supplements does not necessarily match the amount listed on the label, according to a research letter published in ...

What we know (and don't know) about vitamins, diet and health

May 1, 2014
Here's the short version: your kid probably doesn't need a daily vitamin, and there is no magic ingredient in food that will keep you healthy.

Recommended for you

Women who sexually abuse children are just as harmful to their victims as male abusers

August 21, 2017
"That she might seduce a helpless child into sexplay is unthinkable, and even if she did so, what harm can be done without a penis?"

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, researchers find

August 17, 2017
A well-intentioned government regulation designed to offer healthier options in school vending machines has failed to instill better snacking habits in a sample of schools in Appalachian Virginia, according to a study by ...

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control

August 17, 2017
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.