Children with ADHD prone to substance use disorders

Children with ADHD prone to substance use disorders

(HealthDay)—Screening for substance use disorders (SUDs) and the safe use of stimulant medications are important issues in the care of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to research published online June 30 in Pediatrics.

Elizabeth Harstad, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Abuse issued a clinical report on ADHD and .

The researchers found that children with ADHD, compared with their peers, are at increased risk of concurrent SUDs. Treating ADHD with stimulant medications may reduce the risk of SUDs. However, individuals with ADHD, in addition to abusing other substances, may misuse, abuse, and/or divert . Clinicians should screen for SUDs in patients with ADHD and follow guidance for appropriate and safe use of stimulant medications.

"Longer acting preparations of stimulant medication, the prodrug formulation of dextroamphetamine, and nonstimulant medications for ADHD all have lower abuse potential than short-acting preparations of stimulant medication and, thus, their use should be strongly considered if there is a high risk of misuse, diversion, or abuse of stimulant medications," the authors write.


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Journal information: Pediatrics

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