Review: Organic foods may be healthier

July 16, 2014
Review: organic foods may be healthier

(HealthDay)—Organic produce and grains contain more protective antioxidants, less pesticide residue, and lower levels of the toxic metal cadmium than food raised in traditional ways, according to a new review. However, it's not clear what this means for health, and several agriculture experts claim the analysis missed some important points.

For the new study, published July 14 in the British Journal of Nutrition, researchers examined 343 peer-reviewed studies. On average, were 17 percent higher in than in crops grown in traditional ways, the researchers found. And some levels of antioxidants, such as flavanones, flavonols, and anthocyanins, were significantly higher.

But some food researchers faulted the research and its conclusions. "The important toxicological question is how much cadmium are we exposed to, not whether there are any differences between organic and conventional forms," Carl Winter, Ph.D., vice chair of the department of food science and technology at the University of California, Davis, told HealthDay.

But study coauthor Charles Benbrook, Ph.D., a research professor with the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University, told HealthDay that the research offers a clear message. "Organic plant-based foods offer some significant nutritional advantages, and also reduced risks associated with exposures to cadmium and pesticides in food," he said.

Sheepdrove Trust, a charity that supports organic farming, provided partial funding for the study.

Explore further: Eating organic food significantly lowers pesticide exposure

More information: Full Article
Full Text

Related Stories

Eating organic food significantly lowers pesticide exposure

April 30, 2014
Eating an organic diet for a week can cause pesticide levels to drop by almost 90% in adults, research from RMIT University has found.

Eating organic food doesn't lower your overall risk of cancer, study says

March 28, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.

Recommended for you

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

Electronic health records don't reduce administrative costs

February 21, 2018
The federal government thought that adopting certified electronic health record systems (EHR) would reduce administrative costs for physicians in a variety of specialties. However, a major new study conducted by researchers ...

Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study finds

February 20, 2018
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.