National survey finds most US physicians are satisfied

July 22, 2014
National survey finds most U.S. physicians are satisfied
Most U.S. physicians are satisfied, with satisfied physicians more likely to report positive trends in medicine, according to a report published by Jackson Healthcare.

(HealthDay)—Most U.S. physicians are satisfied, with satisfied physicians more likely to report positive trends in medicine, according to a report published by Jackson Healthcare.

Jackson Healthcare conducted their annual national survey of . Seventy-two percent of respondents reported being satisfied or very satisfied, while only 9 percent were very dissatisfied.

According to the survey, satisfied physicians are more likely to say there has been no change in the amount of time they spend with patients (76 percent) and that there has been no change in the number of surgical procedures scheduled per day (69 percent). Seventy percent would encourage a to become a physician and 68 percent feel it is a positive trend that nurse practitioners and physician assistants are taking on more duties traditionally performed by physicians. In contrast, most dissatisfied physicians are unlikely to accept new Medicaid patients due to low or declining reimbursements; are not likely to encourage to become physicians; are likely to work more than eight hours per day; and are likely to say that patients are delaying services and procedures.

"It is obvious dissatisfied physicians see the glass half empty, while satisfied physicians see it as half full," write the authors of the report. "And, in our research, there continues to be a correlation between satisfaction and employment versus private practice."

Explore further: Most physicians report being satisfied with career choice

More information: More Information

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