New remote patient monitoring devices available

July 24, 2014
New remote patient monitoring devices available
Several new remote patient monitoring devices with useful applications are available or under development, according to an article published July 8 in Medical Economics.

(HealthDay)—Several new remote patient monitoring devices with useful applications are available or under development, according to an article published July 8 in Medical Economics.

Daniel R. Verdon, and colleagues describe several remote patient monitoring devices and their applications.

The authors describe different devices: (1) the noninvasive ZIO XT Patch, which continuously records a patient's heartbeats for up to 14 days. After processing and analysis at iRhythm's Clinical Centers, a report gets sent to the physician; (2) Sensoria fitness socks include a fitness monitor device that monitors steps, speed distance, cadence, and foot-landing patterns; (3) the Cue system analyzes samples of saliva, blood, or mucus and monitors vitamin D and testosterone levels, fertility, inflammation, and can diagnose the flu; (4) Google's smart contact lens project intends to monitor glucose levels for those with diabetes; this has not yet been released; and (5) the BodyGuardian system is a heart-monitoring device that tracks cardiac data and stores it on a cloud-based platform, with remote access for physicians. Additional devices that can be connected to smartphones include the Kinsa Smart thermometer and the Glooko MeterSync device.

"As millions of dollars in venture capital pour into the development of remote patient monitoring technologies, these devices, available now or in development, could have profound effects on the ways physicians communicate with, schedule, monitor, and engage patients," the authors write.

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