Stay safe on the roads this July Fourth

July 4, 2014
Stay safe on the roads this july fourth
Nearly 400 people may die in accidents over holiday weekend, National Safety Council estimates.

(HealthDay)—July Fourth won't be about fireworks and fun for everyone: As many as 385 people will die on U.S. roads over this coming weekend, the National Safety Council estimates.

Yet another 41,200 crash-related injuries will require .

"The Fourth of July is a time for celebrations—not the ," Deborah Hersman, president and CEO of the safety council, said in a council news release. "Small steps like wearing your , leaving fireworks to the professionals and keeping an eye on children in and around water can prevent deaths and injuries."

On the positive side, the NSC noted that 141 lives will likely be saved over July Fourth because of the use of seat belts.

To help keep you safe over the Independence Day weekend, the NSC offered these safety tips:

  • Don't use cell phones—handheld or hands-free—or other devices while driving.
  • Do not drink and drive. If you drink, have a designated non-drinking driver or leave the car at home and use other forms of transportation.
  • Be sure that children are in age-appropriate safety seats when traveling in a car.
  • Never leave a child alone in a vehicle.
  • Don't operate a boat under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Make sure that children wear personal flotation devices when in a boat.

Explore further: Have a fun—but safe—fourth of July

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers summer safety tips.

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