Brazil overtakes US as cosmetic surgery world capital

August 3, 2014

Move over Beverly Hills: image-conscious Brazil has overtaken the United States as the world's capital of cosmetic surgery.

O Estado de Sao Paulo newspaper on Sunday quoted official figures as saying the South American giant had recorded 1.49 million procedures in 2013, outstripping the United States by more than 40,000.

The paper reported that the roaring trade is explained by easier access to credit for , allowing patients to pay off the costs of surgery over several years, and the solid reputation of cosmetic surgeons in Brazil.

Liposuction and silicon breast implants were the most popular procedures, although surgeries involving the face and nose were growing in popularity.

The number of rhinoplasties soared from 43,809 in 2011 to 77,224 last year, the paper reported.

Explore further: Necks, butts growth areas for U.S. plastic surgeons

Related Stories

Necks, butts growth areas for U.S. plastic surgeons

February 26, 2014
(HealthDay)—Eyelid surgery and facelifts are up. So are butt augmentations and neck lifts, according to new figures from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons that show a steady increase in cosmetic and reconstructive ...

Breast cancer patients have unrelated plastic surgery after reconstruction

October 10, 2013
(HealthDay)—Some breast cancer patients who've had breast reconstruction after mastectomy also undergo cosmetic surgery in an effort to further boost their self-image and self-esteem, according to a new study.

Taiwan bans cosmetic surgery for under-18s

February 27, 2014
Taiwan on Thursday banned "medically unnecessary" plastic surgery on under-18s in an attempt to protect beauty-obsessed youngsters who overlook the health risks of such procedures, officials said.

Breast implants are most popular form of plastic surgery

February 14, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Breast augmentations are the most common form of plastic surgery nationwide, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Loyola University Health System plastic surgeons are seeing similar trends ...

As economy rebounds, more folks try turning back hands of time

February 20, 2013
(HealthDay)—Evidence of the economic upturn can be found in more than housing starts and auto sales: A new report shows that the number of cosmetic procedures grew 5 percent in 2012.

Beware of claims about cosmetic stem cells procedures, review says

July 30, 2014
Advertising claims for cosmetic procedures using stem cells are running far ahead of the scientific evidence for safety and effectiveness, according to a review in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the ...

Recommended for you

World's first child hand transplant a 'success'

July 19, 2017
The first child in the world to undergo a double hand transplant is now able to write, feed and dress himself, doctors said Tuesday, declaring the ground-breaking operation a success after 18 months.

Knee surgery—have we been doing it wrong?

July 18, 2017
A team of University at Buffalo medical doctors have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery.

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vessels

July 17, 2017
The liver is a particularly squishy, slippery organ, prone to shifting both deadly tumors and life-preserving blood vessels by inches between the time they're discovered on a CT scan and when the patient is lying on an operating ...

Researchers discover indicator of lung transplant rejection

July 13, 2017
Research by scientists at Dignity Health St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center's Norton Thoracic Institute was published in the July 12, 2017 issue of Science Translational Medicine titled "Zbtb7a induction in alveolar ...

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

July 7, 2017
Like many surgeons, Dr. Jason Spector is often faced with the challenge of securely closing the abdominal wall without injuring the intestines. If the process goes awry, there can be serious consequences for patients, including ...

Success with first 20 patients undergoing minimally invasive pancreatic transplant surgery

June 29, 2017
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that their first series of a minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic pancreas disease, known as severe pancreatitis, resulted in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.