Integrons hold key to antibiotic resistance crisis

August 12, 2014

In Mexico the sale of antibiotics for human consumption is controlled to prevent misuse, although in the veterinary sector failure in the implementation of the Official Mexican Standard NOM-064-ZOO-2000, "Guidelines for veterinarian products prescription", has prompted common bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp to become resistant to regular drugs such as streptomycin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, gentamicin, and tetracycline as a result of excess drug use.

The use of antibiotics without prescription for veterinary use is a problem that may seem minimal, but the importance is that each improper administration of these drugs, is conducive to normally present in the intestinal tract of animals are being subjected to a selective pressure, causing them to acquire different mechanisms for its survival.

In order to discover the origin of , Martín Talavera Rojas, professor at the Centre for Research and Advanced Studies in Animal Health of the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEM), analyzed different isolates of bacteria from animals for and reports that such resistance is due to the presence of various resistance genes specific for each class of antibiotics.

The results of the studies were used to detect the presence of genetic fragments (integrons) that cause resistance to various antibiotics, due to the insertion of genes in these structures, which results in increased resistance and prevent income of bactericidal agents, said the scientists.

The cause of bacterial strains that have become more resistant to drugs is that there is not a controlled sale of antibiotics in veterinary and in using them indiscriminately causing bacteria acquire resistance factors that allow it to survive affecting food production.

UAEM researcher concluded that the damage caused by the infection "superbugs" such as Escherichia coli serovar O157: H7 causes bloody diarrhea, severe abdominal pain and in some cases can cause kidney and neurological complications, including uremic syndrome hemolytic; while Salmonella causes bleeding blood and fever.

Talavera Rojas said the isolates of Salmonella spp where resistant to various antibiotics and integrons were present in 40 percent of the isolates (31/77). Afterwards the bacteria were subjected to trimethoprim-sulfa , tetracycline, ampicillin, and streptomycin, to check to these drugs.

Explore further: Emerging antibiotic resistance in Listeria

Related Stories

Emerging antibiotic resistance in Listeria

January 24, 2013
Malaysian researchers have revealed the presence of multidrug-resistant strains of Listeria monocytogenes in frozen burger patties taken from supermarkets and other retail shops in Malaysia. The research was published in ...

Bacterial contamination rife in retail store ground turkey

May 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—Ground turkey from retail stores is often contaminated with fecal bacteria, and in many cases the bacteria are resistant to antibiotics, according to a report published in the June issue of Consumer Reports.

Antibiotic-resistant pathogens and poultry

June 18, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—With recent headlines about dangerous "superbugs," an outbreak of Salmonella from chicken parts on the West Coast and the announcement by a national restaurant chain that it plans to serve only "antibiotic-free" ...

Is there a way to slow the process of bacterial antibiotic resistance?

April 10, 2014
Continually under attack by noxious substances in their environments, bacteria have developed many clever mechanisms to survive. When confronted with an antibiotic, they can destroy it with enzymes, rendering it harmless. ...

Recommended for you

Novel approach to track HIV infection

August 18, 2017
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a novel method of tracking HIV infection, allowing the behavior of individual virions—infectious particles—to be connected to infectivity.

Faulty gene linked to obesity in adults

August 18, 2017
Groundbreaking new research linking obesity and metabolic dysfunction to a problem in the energy generators in cells has been published by researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and The University ...

Two lung diseases killed 3.6 million in 2015: study

August 17, 2017
The two most common chronic lung diseases claimed 3.6 million lives worldwide in 2015, according to a tally published Thursday in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

New test differentiates between Lyme disease, similar illness

August 16, 2017
Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. But it can be confused with similar conditions, including Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness. A team of researchers led by Colorado ...

Addressing superbug resistance with phage therapy

August 16, 2017
International research involving a Monash biologist shows that bacteriophage therapy – a process whereby bacterial viruses attack and destroy specific strains of bacteria - can be used successfully to treat systemic, multidrug ...

Can previous exposure to west Nile alter the course of Zika?

August 15, 2017
West Nile virus is no stranger to the U.S.-Mexico border; thousands of people in the region have contracted the mosquito-borne virus in the past. But could this previous exposure affect how intensely Zika sickens someone ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.