Ketamine does not adversely affect outcomes

August 4, 2014
Review: ketamine does not adversely affect outcomes

(HealthDay)—For intubated patients, ketamine is unlikely to adversely affect patient outcomes compared with other intravenous sedatives, according to a review published online July 22 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Lindsay Cohen, M.D., from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to identify randomized and nonrandomized prospective studies that compared the effect of ketamine with another intravenous sedative in intubated patients. The studies reported at least one outcome of interest (intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures, neurologic outcomes, length of stay, and mortality).

Ten studies, which included data on 953 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The researchers found that nine of these studies were at high risk of bias in at least one domain, while one study was deemed at low risk of bias in all quality assessment domains. There were small reductions in intracranial pressure within 10 minutes of ketamine administration reported in two studies, while two studies reported an increase. There were no reports of significant differences in cerebral perfusion pressure, neurologic outcomes, intensive care unit length of stay, or mortality.

"According to the available literature, the use of ketamine in does not appear to adversely affect ," conclude the authors.

Explore further: Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients and their physicians

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients and their physicians

July 23, 2014
For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised ...

Higher operator volume linked to better PCI outcomes

June 19, 2014
(HealthDay)—Higher individual operator percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) volume is associated with better outcomes, according to a review published online June 17 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Research shows why ketamine is an effective antidepressant but memantine is not

May 27, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—Ketamine is a fast-acting antidepressant. However, it can create symptoms that mimic psychosis. Therefore, doctors don't give it to depressed patients. Memantine, a similar drug, does not have psychotomimetic ...

Intravenous fluid used for critically ill patients linked with adverse outcomes

February 19, 2013
In an analysis of studies that examined critically ill patients requiring an increase in blood fluid volume, intravenous use of the fluid hydroxyethyl starch, compared with other resuscitation solutions, was not associated ...

Mental stress affects ischemia prognosis in patients with CAD

July 2, 2014
(HealthDay)—Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the July ...

Lifestyle changes cut diabetes risk in high-risk patients

October 16, 2013
(HealthDay)—Comprehensive lifestyle interventions decrease the incidence of type 2 diabetes in high-risk patients, but the benefits are less clear in diagnosed patients, according to a review published in the Oct. 15 issue ...

Recommended for you

Researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

July 25, 2017
Scientists from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. ...

Research examines lung cell turnover as risk factor and target for treatment of influenza pneumonia

July 24, 2017
Influenza is a recurring global health threat that, according to the World Health Organization, is responsible for as many as 500,000 deaths every year, most due to influenza pneumonia, or viral pneumonia. Infection with ...

Scientists propose novel therapy to lessen risk of obesity-linked disease

July 24, 2017
With obesity related illnesses a global pandemic, researchers propose in the Journal of Clinical Investigation using a blood thinner to target molecular drivers of chronic metabolic inflammation in people eating high-fat ...

Raccoon roundworm—a hidden human parasite?

July 24, 2017
The raccoon that topples your trashcan and pillages your garden may leave more than just a mess. More likely than not, it also contaminates your yard with parasites—most notably, raccoon roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis).

Google searches can be used to track dengue in underdeveloped countries

July 20, 2017
An analytical tool that combines Google search data with government-provided clinical data can quickly and accurately track dengue fever in less-developed countries, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

July 19, 2017
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged long before the introduction of the antibiotic methicillin into clinical practice, according to a study published in the open access journal Genome Biology. It was ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.