Survey asks nation's youth 'How would you like to feel?'

Survey asks nation's youth 'How would you like to feel?'

How do you feel in school? How would you like to feel?

The nation's will be asked to answer those questions in a survey distributed April 9 by the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and Born This Way Foundation, which hope to find ways to bridge the gap between emotional reality and aspiration among the nation's youth.

The survey launches the Emotion Revolution campaign led by Yale and the foundation formed by Lady Gaga to build awareness of the critical role emotions play in a young person's education and well-being.

Results of the survey are expected to be announced at the Emotion Revolution Summit to be held at Yale in October.

"Research has shown us repeatedly that the skills of emotional intelligence profoundly impact a person's ability to thrive – academically, personally, and professionally," said Marc Brackett, Director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. "Emotions drive learning, decision making, relationships, and health. The Emotion Revolution survey will allow us to take the temperature of young people around the country, improving our understanding of how to best equip them with the tools they need to succeed in every facet of life."

Youth participants from around the country, special guests including Brackett, Yale President Peter Salovey, one of the founders of movement, and Born This Way Foundation co-founders Cynthia Germanotta and Lady Gaga are expected to speak at the summit.

"Our organizations are dedicated to empowering in order to make the world a kinder and braver place. This survey is a fundamental step towards accomplishing that goal," Germanotta said.


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Provided by Yale University
Citation: Survey asks nation's youth 'How would you like to feel?' (2015, April 10) retrieved 5 March 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-04-survey-nation-youth.html
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