Bolivia wants to ban salt from restaurants

September 24, 2015

Bolivia has a novel idea to cut down the salt intake of its people: banish it from restaurant tables.

About a third of Bolivia's population suffers from hypertension, or , and the government blames salt for it.

"We must remove table salt," announced Guillermo Mendoza, vice minister of consumer rights, upon taking office.

Mendoza also wants restaurants to indicate to diners how much salt and sugar is in their meals.

Explore further: Blame it on your brain: Salt and hypertension

Related Stories

Blame it on your brain: Salt and hypertension

January 22, 2015
An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake "reprograms" the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body's arterial blood ...

Many Americans trying to cut their salt intake: CDC

July 3, 2015
(HealthDay)—Worried about links between high daily salt intake, high blood pressure and stroke, half of American adults questioned in a recent poll say they've tried to cut back on sodium.

Pass on the salt? NYC board to vote on menu sodium warnings

September 9, 2015
Chain restaurants across New York City may soon be compelled to add a new item to their menus: a salt-warning symbol.

The result of eating too much salt can be measured in blood pressure

July 29, 2015
People who gradually increase the amount of salt in their diet and people who habitually eat a higher salt diet both face an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study published in the Journal ...

Training can improve patients' fluid, salt intake in hemodialysis

July 12, 2015
(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing hemodialysis, a controlled fluid and salt intake training process can decrease consumption of both salt and fluid, according to a study published online June 28 in the Journal of Renal ...

America: Time to shake the salt habit?

March 28, 2013
The love affair between U.S. residents and salt is making us sick: high sodium intake increases blood pressure, and leads to higher rates of heart attack and strokes. Nonetheless, Americans continue to ingest far higher amounts ...

Recommended for you

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control

August 17, 2017
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) ...

Energy dense foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status

August 17, 2017
Diet is believed to play a role in cancer risk. Current research shows that an estimated 30% of cancers could be prevented through nutritional modifications. While there is a proven link between obesity and certain types ...

Technology is changing Generation smartphone, and not always for the better

August 16, 2017
It's easy to imagine some graybeard long ago weighing in on how this new generation, with all its fancy wheels, missed out on the benefits of dragging stuff from place to place.

The environmental injustice of beauty

August 16, 2017
Women of color have higher levels of beauty-product-related chemicals in their bodies compared to white women, according to a commentary published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The authors say ...

Heavily used pesticide linked to breathing problems in farmworkers' children

August 15, 2017
Elemental sulfur, the most heavily used pesticide in California, may harm the respiratory health of children living near farms that use the pesticide, according to new research led by UC Berkeley.

Taking a stand on staying mobile after 80

August 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—If you want to stay as fit as possible well into your 80s, the answer may be as simple as standing on your own two feet.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.