Autism may be overdiagnosed in the United States

October 27, 2015
Autism may be overdiagnosed in the united states

(HealthDay)—As many as 9 percent of American children diagnosed with autism may not have the disorder, according to a federal government study published online Oct. 20 in Autism.

Researchers used a probability-based national survey to compare 1,420 currently diagnosed and 187 previously diagnosed children ages 6 to 17 years.

Approximately 13 percent of the children ever diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder were estimated to have "lost" the diagnosis. Parents of 74 percent of these children believed the modification of diagnosis was due to new information.

"The results of this study suggest that some children with , attentional flexibility problems, or other conditions may be receiving provisional yet inaccurate diagnoses of from nonspecialists," the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of Washington researchers write.

Explore further: ADHD may mask autism in young kids

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

ADHD may mask autism in young kids

September 15, 2015

(HealthDay)—Symptoms attributed to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may overshadow or mask autism spectrum disorder in very young children, a new study reveals.

Autism and rare childhood speech disorder often coincide

May 27, 2015

Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand-in-hand, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Recommended for you

For kids with autism, imitation is key on road to speech

April 5, 2017

Nearly 30 percent of children with autism will not have learned to flexibly speak by the end of elementary school. For researchers looking for ways to help, learning when to intervene in the children's speech development ...

Area of the brain affected by autism detected

April 3, 2017

Brain researchers at ETH Zurich and other universities have shown for the first time that a region of the brain associated with empathy only activates very weakly in autistic people. This knowledge could help to develop new ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.