Videos reveal how HIV spreads in real time

October 2, 2015 by Bill Hathaway
Videos reveal how HIV spreads in real time

How retroviruses like HIV spread in their hosts had been unknown—until a Yale team devised a way to watch it actually happen in a living organism. The elaborate and sometimes surprising steps the virus takes to reach and spread in the lymph nodes of a mouse have been captured on videos and described in the Oct. 2 issue of the journal Science.

"It's all very different than what people thought," said Walther Mothes, associate professor of microbial pathogenesis and co-senior author the paper.

Tracking fluorescently stained viruses in mice, the Yale team led by Mothes and co-senior author Priti Kumar, assistant professor of medicine and , used sophisticated imaging technology to capture the action as the bind to macrophages via a sticky protein that is located at the capsule of the lymph node (in blue).

But that is only the first step of the journey. The captured viral particles open to a rare type of B-cell, seen in red in the accompanying movie. The virus particles then attach themselves to the tail of these B-cells and are dragged into the interior of the lymph node. In one to two days, these B-cells establish stable connections with tissue, enabling full transmission of the virus.

The insights provided by the videos identify a potential way to prevent HIV from infecting surrounding tissue. If researchers could develop a way to block the action of the sticky protein the virus uses to bind to macrophages, then the ' transmission could be halted, Mothes suggested.

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"The direct study of viral pathogenesis within living animals should reveal more surprises in the future," Mothes said.

Postdoctoral researcher Xaver Sewald is lead author of the paper. Pamela Bjorkman of Cal Tech also contributed to the research, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, The Leopoldina German National Academy of Sciences, and the China Scholarships Council.

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Explore further: Why HIV's cloak has a long tail

More information: Retroviruses use CD169-mediated trans-infection of permissive lymphocytes to establish infection, Science DOI: 10.1126/science.aab2749

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ronn1968
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 02, 2015
If people wouldn't shoot up on drugs and engage in anal sex, HIV would be almost nonexistent. People don't like to hear that, but it is true. Even the heterosexuals who get HIV are the ones who take drugs and engage in anal sex.
JamesCT
5 / 5 (1) Oct 02, 2015
The whole thing doesn't make sense. Why is there such a thing as what tthe medical community calls "long term non progressors".? I listened to over fifteen podcasts on How Positive Are You's website and the House of Numbers movie and now I seriously question the existence of HIV.
PPS
not rated yet Oct 04, 2015
People know how not to get it. Don't have unprotected sex with several people. Don't have unprotected sex with someone that does sleep with several people. Don't share needles. Disgusting.

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