Diabetes predicts worse survival in renal cell carcinoma

November 19, 2015
Diabetes predicts worse survival in renal cell carcinoma

(HealthDay)—Diabetes mellitus is associated with worse prognosis in terms of progression-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma treated surgically, according to a study published in the December issue of The Journal of Urology.

Hakmin Lee, from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in the South Korea, and colleagues examined the correlation between and prognosis in with who underwent surgical treatment. Data were reviewed for 3,075 patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with radical or . Four hundred seventeen patients with diabetes were matched with 814 patients without diabetes.

The researchers found that patients with diabetes showed worse prognosis in terms of progression-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival before matching (all P < 0.001). In matched cohorts, patients with diabetes had inferior progression-free (P = 0.001), overall (P < 0.001), and cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001) compared to those without diabetes. Diabetes independently predicted disease progression (hazard ratio, 1.766), all-cause mortality (odds ratio, 1.825), and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 2.266), on multivariate analyses. For patients with diabetes, high glycated hemoglobin independently predicted postoperative disease progression (hazard ratio, 2.221).

"Diabetes mellitus is an independent predictor of cancer-specific and overall survival in patients who undergo surgery for renal cell carcinoma," the authors write.

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