More evidence found on potential harmful effects of e-cigarettes

e-cigarette
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While e-cigarette use is increasing worldwide, little is known about the health effects e-cigarettes pose for users. A University of Louisville researcher is working to change that status.

Daniel J. Conklin, Ph.D., professor of medicine in UofL's Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, will discuss his early research identifying potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting.

Conklin will be among a three-member panel discussing "New and Emerging Tobacco Products: Biomarkers of Exposure and Injury," Friday, Feb. 12, from 8-9:30 a.m. at the Marshall Ballroom East of the Marriott Wardman Park, 2660 Woodley Rd. Northwest, Washington.

Conklin will share new data showing that e-cigarettes have been shown to speed up atherosclerosis - the plaque-causing disease that leads to heart attack, stroke and . When atherosclerosis affects the arteries of the heart, it is known as , a condition that affects more than 15 million Americans and causes 500,000 deaths annually.

"Currently, we do not know whether e-cigarettes are harmful," Conklin said. "They do not generate smoke as do conventional cigarettes but they do generate an aerosol - the vapor - that alters indoor air quality and contains toxic aldehydes. We investigated the direct effects of these toxins on cardiovascular disease in the laboratory."

Conklin and his team exposed one set of mice to varying levels of e-cigarette aerosol, , smokeless tobacco or to an aldehyde produced by tobacco, acrolein, which is thought to pose 80-85 percent of the non-cancer health risk of tobacco smoke. Another set of mice was exposed to nicotine alone to understand whether nicotine by itself had any effect.

Not surprisingly and consistent with previous studies, exposure to tobacco smoke increased the amount of atherosclerosis in mice. At the same time, the research team found that either e-cigarette aerosol or smokeless tobacco exposure alone also increased atherosclerosis.

Conklin was particularly intrigued by the results seen with exposure to acrolein or nicotine alone. "Somewhat surprising was the finding that either nicotine alone or acrolein alone at levels equivalent to those present in or mainstream smoke also increased atherosclerosis in mice.

"These findings indicate that multiple tobacco-derived constituents have cardiovascular disease-causing potential."


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Citation: More evidence found on potential harmful effects of e-cigarettes (2016, February 11) retrieved 26 May 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-02-evidence-potential-effects-e-cigarettes.html
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Feb 13, 2016
Either this article is very poorly written, or it is simply another example of a wildly exaggerated headline. The report on this study is clearly attempting to link vaping to smoking like health consequences, but the way that it reads, it simply adds to the growing volume of speculation with no actual facts.

"Currently, we do not know whether e-cigarettes are harmful..."

Perhaps if you were attempting to be honest, you would have led this article with that.

"Conklin and his team exposed one set of mice to varying levels of e-cigarette aerosol, tobacco smoke, smokeless tobacco or to an aldehyde produced by tobacco, acrolein..."

You do realize that the way this reads, the researchers exposed one set of mice to all of variables. How exactly would this be evidence that "e-cigarette" vapor had anything to do with the increase in arterial sclerosis, if in addition to "e-cigarette" vapor, the same mice were exposed to other toxins?

*continued*

Feb 13, 2016
"At the same time, the research team found that either e-cigarette aerosol or smokeless tobacco exposure alone also increased atherosclerosis."

Again, the way this worded, EITHER "e-cigarette" vapor OR smokeless tobacco also caused arterial sclerosis. Well, which one was it? Was this supposed to imply both? If not, what exactly is the evidence of health risks connected with "e-cigarettes" of which the headline to this article claims.

Feb 13, 2016
The headline reads, "More evidence found on potential harmful effects of e-cigarettes."

The first quote from the leader researcher reads, "Currently, we do not know whether e-cigarettes are harmful..."

Apparently the apparent growing amount of "evidence" was not enough to convince even Dr. Conklin.

Was this study funded in any way from the $10.7 million that was diverted to UofL through the FDA for tobacco research? You know the FDA, the agency which is trying so desperately to regulate and manage the vaping industry by lumping vaping products in with known harmful tobacco products?

Feb 13, 2016
Where is the link the the study? Without the data this article holds no value.

What are the levels in ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems) in comparison to the combustion of tobacco cigarettes? That is very important since they are a harm reduction tool.

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