Burden of hep C virus substantial despite oral antiviral therapy

March 30, 2016

(HealthDay)—The burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and associated disease is projected to remain considerable even in the era of oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), according to a study published online March 25 in Hepatology.

Jagpreet Chhatwal, Ph.D., from the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Technology Assessment in Boston, and colleagues projected the HCV-associated disease burden in the era of oral DAAs using a previously developed and validated Hepatitis C Disease Burden Simulation model. The model simulated the actual clinical management of HCV from 2001 onward. Two were also simulated: no treatment and treatment with peginterferon-based therapies only.

The researchers found that an estimated 2.5 million noninstitutionalized people were viremic in 2010, which decreased to 1.9 million in 2015 and is projected to decline to below 1 million by 2020. From the launch of oral DAAs in 2014 to 2030, 1.8 million HCV patients are expected to receive HCV treatment. It will take four to six years to treat most patients who are aware of their disease, based on current HCV management practices; in 2020, 560,000 patients will still remain unaware of their disease. In the next 35 years, 320,000 patients will die, 157,000 will develop hepatocellular carcinoma, and 203,000 will develop decompensated cirrhosis.

"Increasing HCV screening and treatment capacity is essential to further decreasing HCV burden in the United States," the authors write.

The study was partially funded by Gilead Sciences.

Explore further: More cost-effective cure for hepatitis C may be close

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

More cost-effective cure for hepatitis C may be close

March 22, 2016
The cost of treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) could be cut up to 50 percent if mathematical models are used to predict when patients can safely stop taking direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medication, according to a new study ...

Transmission of hepatitis C virus following antiviral treatment

July 8, 2014
Millions of people throughout the world are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Left untreated, infection results in serious complications such as cirrhosis of the liver and cancer. Many HCV-infected patients respond well ...

New Hepatitis C treatments cost-effective, but only for selected patients, study shows

March 30, 2015
A study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups ...

All-oral, DAA options for HCV effective and well tolerated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis

April 23, 2015
Interim data presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 from the HCV-TARGET study show that all-oral, direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C (HCV) is well tolerated and highly effective in patients ...

Predicting the outcome of hepatitis C virus treatment

July 1, 2014
Millions of people throughout the world are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and cancer. Directly acting antiviral agents inhibit viral proteins and have been used to successfully ...

Hepatitis C screening essential to help catch patients with advanced liver fibrosis

April 25, 2015
Study results presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that the occurrence of advanced liver fibrosis is similar for patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), whether or not they have been diagnosed.

Recommended for you

Anti-malaria drug shows promise as Zika virus treatment

November 17, 2017
A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and UC San Diego School of Medicine has found that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective ...

Decrease in sunshine, increase in Rickets

November 17, 2017
A University of Toronto student and professor have teamed up to discover that Britain's increasing cloudiness during the summer could be an important reason for the mysterious increase in Rickets among British children over ...

Scientists identify biomarkers that indicate likelihood of survival in infected patients

November 17, 2017
Scientists have identified a set of biomarkers that indicate which patients infected with the Ebola virus are most at risk of dying from the disease.

Research team unlocks secrets of Ebola

November 16, 2017
In a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, published today (Nov. 16, 2017) in Cell Host and Microbe, a scientific team led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison has ...

Study raises possibility of naturally acquired immunity against Zika virus

November 16, 2017
Birth defects in babies born infected with Zika virus remain a major health concern. Now, scientists suggest the possibility that some women in high-risk Zika regions may already be protected and not know it.

A structural clue to attacking malaria's 'Achilles heel'

November 16, 2017
Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and PATH's Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) have shed light on how the human immune system recognizes the malaria parasite though investigation of antibodies generated ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.