Video: Why are people allergic to peanuts?

March 22, 2016, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

For 1 to 2 percent of the global population, eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich could be potentially fatal. What makes peanut allergies so lethal, and why is the number of peanut-allergy sufferers on the rise?

This week on Reactions, Andrew Maynard from Risk Bites explains what causes and why we need to rethink how we prevent them.

Check it out here:

Explore further: Doctors recommend early exposure to prevent peanut allergies

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