Wine beats other types of alcohol in reduction of T2DM risk

Wine beats other types of alcohol in reduction of T2DM risk

(HealthDay)—Wine is associated with a greater decrease in the risk of type 2 diabetes than beer or spirits, according to a review published online May 11 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

Jin Huang, Ph.D., from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China, and colleagues conducted a and meta-analysis to examine the relationship between intake of specific types of and incidence of type 2 . Data were included from three prospective cohort studies, with 397,296 study participants and 20,641 cases of type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that correlated with a significant reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes compared with no or rare alcohol consumption (pooled relative risks, 0.85), while consumption of beer or spirits was associated with a slight trend toward decreasing risk of type 2 diabetes (relative risk, 0.96 and 0.95, respectively). There was a U-shaped correlation between all three alcohol types and type 2 diabetes. The peak risk reduction was seen for 20 to 30 g/day for wine and beer and for 7 to 15 g/day of spirits, with decreases of 20, 9, and 5 percent, respectively.

"This study indicated that wine may be more helpful for protection against type 2 diabetes than beer or spirits," the authors write.


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Citation: Wine beats other types of alcohol in reduction of T2DM risk (2016, May 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-05-wine-alcohol-reduction-t2dm.html
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