Paraguay reports first two cases of Zika birth defect

July 27, 2016

Paraguay reported its first two cases Wednesday of babies born with microcephaly linked to the Zika virus, which is blamed for a surge in the birth defect across Latin America.

"The central laboratory confirmed the birth of two babies with microcephaly caused by Zika," health ministry official Agueda Cabello told a press conference.

Since Zika, a mosquito-borne virus, was detected in Latin America last year, health authorities have sounded the alarm over a sharp rise in the number of infected mothers giving birth to babies with microcephaly, or abnormally small heads.

The World Health Organization has declared an emergency over the apparent link between the virus and the potentially debilitating or deadly .

Brazil has been the country hardest hit, with more than 1,000 confirmed cases of microcephaly blamed on Zika.

Spain reported the first case Monday of a baby born in Europe with microcephaly linked to Zika. The mother had caught the virus during a trip abroad, though authorities did not say where.

Zika, which causes flu-like symptoms and a rash, is mainly transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. It has also been shown to spread through sexual contact.

Explore further: Colombia declares its Zika epidemic over (Update)

Related Stories

Colombia declares its Zika epidemic over (Update)

July 25, 2016
Colombia declared Monday its Zika epidemic is over, but warned that the mosquito-borne virus, which is blamed for causing brain damage in babies, would continue circulating on a smaller scale.

Panama reports 4 cases of Zika-related microcephaly

May 5, 2016
Health authorities in Panama said Thursday that they have identified four cases of the birth defect microcephaly linked to the Zika virus.

Chile reports first case of sexually transmitted Zika

March 26, 2016
Authorities Saturday reported the first sexually transmitted case of Zika in mainland Chile, where there is no known presence of the mosquito generally blamed for passing on the virus suspected of causing birth defects.

El Salvador confirms first Zika-linked birth defect

June 15, 2016
El Salvador on Tuesday confirmed its first case of microcephaly in a baby that was linked to a Zika infection in the mother.

Colombia confirms first cases of birth defects tied to Zika

April 14, 2016
Colombia has confirmed the first two cases of a rare birth defect associated with the spread of Zika.

Brazil confirms 907 Zika-linked microcephaly cases

March 23, 2016
Brazil has confirmed 907 cases of microcephaly and 198 babies with the birth defect who have died since the Zika virus outbreak started in October, authorities said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Scientists identify potential drug target in blood-feeding hookworms

March 22, 2018
In hookworms that infect and feed on the blood of mice, scientists have discovered a key step in blood digestion that can be targeted to disrupt the parasite's development and survival. These findings, published in PLOS Pathogens ...

Global burden of low back pain—a consequence of negligence and misinformation

March 21, 2018
A series of groundbreaking papers from Australian and international researchers in The Lancet, published today (22/3) warns that low back pain is a major health burden globally - across developed and developing nations - ...

Microscopic 'shuttles' transport enzyme from cells to trigger onset of kidney disease

March 21, 2018
A new study involving the University of Sheffield has identified a key culprit in the onset of kidney disease in a major marker for kidney disease development.

Metabolite therapy proves effective in treating C. difficile in mice

March 20, 2018
A team of UCLA researchers found that a metabolite therapy was effective in mice for treating a serious infection of the colon known as Clostridium difficile infection, or C. difficile.

Study of COPD patients has created a 'looking glass' into genome of pathogen

March 19, 2018
Decades of work on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at the University at Buffalo and the Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System have yielded extraordinary information about the pathogen that does ...

Sick air travelers mostly likely to infect next row: study

March 19, 2018
People who fly on airplanes while contagious can indeed get other people sick, but the risk is mainly to those seated next to them or in the adjacent row, US researchers said Monday.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.